Parking Tickets and Corruption

New York City, home to the United Nations and many foreign diplomats, has famously coped with the problem of diplomats racking up comically high numbers of parking tickets. Ray Fisman and Edward Miguel have made a good lemonade from these lemons, writing a paper that explores the correlation between a given country’s level of corruption and its diplomats’ willingness to incur tickets. Their conclusion:

We find tremendous persistence in corruption norms: diplomats from high corruption countries (based on existing survey-based indices) have significantly more parking violations. In a second main result, officials from countries that survey evidence indicates have less favorable popular views of the United States commit significantly more parking violations, providing nonlaboratory evidence on the role that sentiment and affinity play in economic decision-making.

Hat tip: James Erlandson and the Private Sector Development Blog.

TAGS:

Leave A Comment

Comments are moderated and generally will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive.

 

COMMENTS: 32

View All Comments »
  1. blou888 says:

    And to PlantKing:

    Are you a politician?

    Only joking! Only Joking!

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0
  2. blou888 says:

    And to PlantKing:

    Are you a politician?

    Only joking! Only Joking!

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0
  3. Blandy says:

    PlantKing,

    If you want to be enlightened about corrupt politicians, have a look at what’s going on in Australia with the Australian Wheat Board and exports to Iraq.

    Sometimes the best way to cope with Australian politics is just to laugh at it (a la Bill Bryson), other times it’s just too confusing.

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0
  4. Blandy says:

    PlantKing,

    If you want to be enlightened about corrupt politicians, have a look at what’s going on in Australia with the Australian Wheat Board and exports to Iraq.

    Sometimes the best way to cope with Australian politics is just to laugh at it (a la Bill Bryson), other times it’s just too confusing.

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0
  5. jonathan says:

    Don, Ken Livingstone hasn’t served a month’s suspension for his comments – he is currently appealing the decision on the grounds of the body concerned has no authority to prevent him carrying out his elected duties.
    He didn’t say the journalist reminded him of a concentration camp guard, he said the defence that pestering him and his partner was ‘only following orders’ reminded him of a concentration guard’s excuses.

    dg: the London v US diplomats scenario is not driven by London politics. Anyone who drives through the centre of London has to pay the congestion charge. It’s the diplomats who are playing politics.

    Considering the charge has led to a reduction in traffic in the capital, and diplomatic cars can now get to places faster, it only seems fair that the richest country in the world should contribute to the scheme, doesn’t it?
    The money owed by the US to London could help pay for the extra security their presence warrants, or upkeep of the parks the staff and their families no doubt enjoy…

    Using ‘diplomatic immunity’ is a bit of a lame excuse. If you’re going to play that card for a traffic offence, what else are you going to try? It makes diplomats look dodgy. Their actions have caused the US’s image in the UK untold harm, all for the sake of $10 a day.

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0
  6. jonathan says:

    Don, Ken Livingstone hasn’t served a month’s suspension for his comments – he is currently appealing the decision on the grounds of the body concerned has no authority to prevent him carrying out his elected duties.
    He didn’t say the journalist reminded him of a concentration camp guard, he said the defence that pestering him and his partner was ‘only following orders’ reminded him of a concentration guard’s excuses.

    dg: the London v US diplomats scenario is not driven by London politics. Anyone who drives through the centre of London has to pay the congestion charge. It’s the diplomats who are playing politics.

    Considering the charge has led to a reduction in traffic in the capital, and diplomatic cars can now get to places faster, it only seems fair that the richest country in the world should contribute to the scheme, doesn’t it?
    The money owed by the US to London could help pay for the extra security their presence warrants, or upkeep of the parks the staff and their families no doubt enjoy…

    Using ‘diplomatic immunity’ is a bit of a lame excuse. If you’re going to play that card for a traffic offence, what else are you going to try? It makes diplomats look dodgy. Their actions have caused the US’s image in the UK untold harm, all for the sake of $10 a day.

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0
  7. mikej says:

    The congestion charge represents an effort to use market forces to deal with a difficult problem in London. Lots better than banning vehicles from the city center, for instance. Too bad the US, that bastion of the free market (or is it actually just a nest of crony capitalists?), chooses not to accept a market solution to a public problem.

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0
  8. mikej says:

    The congestion charge represents an effort to use market forces to deal with a difficult problem in London. Lots better than banning vehicles from the city center, for instance. Too bad the US, that bastion of the free market (or is it actually just a nest of crony capitalists?), chooses not to accept a market solution to a public problem.

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0