G.V.Varma

I have been attending viva voce examination as an examiner in two universities and found several new areas of research done by young graduate students.A few are the following:
1.Land and Water Management Institutions
2.Development Projects and Displacement
3.Survival Mechanism of Below Poverty Line
Groups
4.ECONOMIC IMPACT OF HIV/AIDS etc.
Many entreprising and imaginative young economists are coming up in developing countries like India and they are not getting public attention as those who do their studies in USA.

Andy from Houston

This is off topic, but here goes:

Have you guys written anything about statistics involving married people and how they met, or is there any data discussing this point?

I am convinced that most people get married due to circumstance i.e. meeting their significant other because at work / or living close rather than being set up by friends on a date or picking up a stranger in a bar, ect...

It seems to me that people follow the path of least resistance, even when it comes to finding a partner for life. I just wish I had some indication of whether this is actually true.

Anyways, back to the topic at hand - yeah, young people with promising careers. Awesome!

sophistry

Name, Ph.D Institution
Chetty, Harvard
DellaVigna, Harvard
Gabaix,Harvard
Gentzkow, Harvard
Malmendier, Harvard
Olken, Harvard
Oster, Harvard
Shapiro, Harvard
Wolfers,Harvard
Fryer, PSU (Harvard Prof)
Finklestein, MIT (Harvard undergrad)
Karlan, MIT
Rothstein, Berkeley

nimishbatra

Off topic, yes, but...
http://www. boingboing.net/2007/01/10/tapscotts_wikinomics.html
?

Wikinomics. (all hyperlinks deliberately broken up)

www. wikinomics.com

http://www. amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1591841380/downandoutint-20

zbicyclist

I remember seeing this sign in the economics department of my undergraduate institution:

"You can be a promising young economist for at most 3 years."

Harsh, but approximately true. Let's check back in 2010 ;)

elle

Andy,

Social psychology might offer a couple leads into what you are asking. Try: law of propinquity /proximity (Festinger, Schachter & Back, 1950). Mere exposure effect (Zajonc, 1968).

If you have any questions or cannot access the articles, email me and I will be glad to send them to you. lilunia.steinman@gmail.com

Take care,
L

zbicyclist

Elle:

"Mere exposure" is an interesting approach to this -- Bob Zajonc basically shows that the more you are exposed to something, the more you like it.

Doesn't work to explain divorce, though. (Or, if you can figure out how it does, send me a post.)

Andy from Houston

Thank you elle, referencing propinquity did help me understand this issue.

G.V.Varma

I have been attending viva voce examination as an examiner in two universities and found several new areas of research done by young graduate students.A few are the following:
1.Land and Water Management Institutions
2.Development Projects and Displacement
3.Survival Mechanism of Below Poverty Line
Groups
4.ECONOMIC IMPACT OF HIV/AIDS etc.
Many entreprising and imaginative young economists are coming up in developing countries like India and they are not getting public attention as those who do their studies in USA.

Andy from Houston

This is off topic, but here goes:

Have you guys written anything about statistics involving married people and how they met, or is there any data discussing this point?

I am convinced that most people get married due to circumstance i.e. meeting their significant other because at work / or living close rather than being set up by friends on a date or picking up a stranger in a bar, ect...

It seems to me that people follow the path of least resistance, even when it comes to finding a partner for life. I just wish I had some indication of whether this is actually true.

Anyways, back to the topic at hand - yeah, young people with promising careers. Awesome!

sophistry

Name, Ph.D Institution
Chetty, Harvard
DellaVigna, Harvard
Gabaix,Harvard
Gentzkow, Harvard
Malmendier, Harvard
Olken, Harvard
Oster, Harvard
Shapiro, Harvard
Wolfers,Harvard
Fryer, PSU (Harvard Prof)
Finklestein, MIT (Harvard undergrad)
Karlan, MIT
Rothstein, Berkeley

nimishbatra

Off topic, yes, but...
http://www. boingboing.net/2007/01/10/tapscotts_wikinomics.html
?

Wikinomics. (all hyperlinks deliberately broken up)

www. wikinomics.com

http://www. amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1591841380/downandoutint-20

zbicyclist

I remember seeing this sign in the economics department of my undergraduate institution:

"You can be a promising young economist for at most 3 years."

Harsh, but approximately true. Let's check back in 2010 ;)

elle

Andy,

Social psychology might offer a couple leads into what you are asking. Try: law of propinquity /proximity (Festinger, Schachter & Back, 1950). Mere exposure effect (Zajonc, 1968).

If you have any questions or cannot access the articles, email me and I will be glad to send them to you. lilunia.steinman@gmail.com

Take care,
L

zbicyclist

Elle:

"Mere exposure" is an interesting approach to this -- Bob Zajonc basically shows that the more you are exposed to something, the more you like it.

Doesn't work to explain divorce, though. (Or, if you can figure out how it does, send me a post.)

Andy from Houston

Thank you elle, referencing propinquity did help me understand this issue.