egretman

Why all these free registrations?
It just leads to frustrations.
And not sell your info to a third party?
Still leaves them treating us as Moriarty
And why do they want our email address
If they aren't going to fill it with their mess
It all seems a little too convenient
May I suggest they be more lenient
If your website is going to be free
Then get out of the way and let me be

RandyfromCanada

l quit and think we should all refuse to particpate in any more reading with "free registation" all every happens is u get spam e-mails

lets all just type in NO MORE .......

Jalden

Yeah, I would like to third posters 1 and 3.

FortyTwo

It wouldn't have mattered if you had registered. I tried to read the article because it looked intriguing, and I didn't mind using one of my lesser email accounts to set up the registration. So, after filling out the forms, logging in, and clicking the link to read the rest of the article, I received the message, "Sorry, that URL was not formed correctly."

I tried using their search feature to access the article by other means, but apparently it's unsearchable, perhaps because its issue date is in April. At any rate, I'm left hanging in what appears to be midsentence, though the four-period ellipsis may indicate that it just trails off....

At any rate, don't bother registering; as someone noted above, it really does just lead to frustration.

Kent

What economics Nobel Laureate James Heckman said:

[In some quarters of our profession, the level of discussion has sunk to the level of a New Yorker article: coffee-table articles about “cute” topics, papers using “clever” instruments. The authors of these papers are usually unclear about the economic questions they address, the data used to support their conclusions and the econometrics used to justify their estimates. This is a sad development that I hope is a passing fad.]

(source: http://minneapolisfed.org/pubs/region/05-06/heckman.cfm)

lpennock

I had the same experience as FortyTwo (#5). I registered with an address I only use for clicking on confirmation links (and thus don't care about spam) but I could never actually access the article due to the "URL not formed correctly error." I also tried searching for it to no avail. They should really learn to open up certain articles behind a pay or registration wall when bloggers generate enough traffic to them like so many other on-line publications have figured out. The WSJ has this down to a science. They should also fix their search functionality.

lpennock

Update: ah, so they lied. It says, "This article requires free registration" on the link provided by this blog, but when I finally did find it by searching for articles by Noam Scheiber, it states that "This article is for subscribers only." Such a tease. Here is the link FYI: https://ssl.tnr.com/p/docsub.mhtml?i=20070402&s=scheiber040207

RandyfromCanada

wonder if Steve gets a kick back for sucking us in to signing up ?
maybe his way of selling our e-mail addresses ......

FortyTwo

Indeed, they did lie. I feel cheated, even though the only thing they've ultimately taken from me was my time and a seldom used email address. In any case, I'm not going to jump through any more hoops for them.

cshawnb

i "registered" and still could not view the complete article. would you please just copy and past it into yur blog. put it all in quotes, that's legal.

armynixon

if you do not want to use your email for future sites, go to http://www.guerrillamail.com/ for a temporary email address.

rafaelcosentino

You can get free access to The New Republics, subscription required article with a netpass from www.congoo.com

It also works on Wall Street Journal, Zacks, Mornignstar, Harvard Health and dozens more

bodil

Use bugmenot.com to avoid the "free registration".

If you're having trouble finding the article, try searching for "Freaks and geeks" in the search bar on the left.

Jason Malloy

I like it how all the other economic blogs are having long academic dialogues over the article on Freakonomics, while on the actual Freakonomics blog all we find is a handful of leaches trying to break through the registration wall. Here: http://blog.spitaki.org/2007/03/28/economics-descent-into-freakonomics/

Now allow me to lead the discussion in a more productive direction:

[[[QUOTE]]]"Levitt doesn't immediately strike you as a mesmerizing speaker. His voice is too high, except when it's trailing off at the end of a sentence. He leans heavily on the word “OK.” He is lanky and concave-chested and often fails to make eye contact. But Levitt has a droll magnetism, a certain anti-charisma."[[[QUOTE]]]

NEEEERRRRRDDDD!!!

frankenduf

it seems there's a high art/low art distinction here- one wouldn't compare dostoevsky to harry potter, and one wouldn't compare marx to freakonomics- certainly the field of economics should be broad enough to embrace its analyses both high and low- the old school economists are by definition curmudgeons, but they are accurate to point out the impoverishment which follows when confusing the low with the high

SteveSailer

Non-economist social scientists are beginning to weigh in on Steven D. Levitt's most famous Freakonomics theory. Here's a paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association (2006, Aug):

Fertility and the Abortion-Crime Debate
Hangartner, D. , Sykes, B. L. and Hathaway, E. A.

Abstract: Recently some scholars have asserted that abortion legalization during the 1970s resulted in lower crime 15-20 years later. While economists have both substantiated and challenged these findings, sociologists and demographers have been mute on the topic. In this paper, we show that the supposed link between abortion and crime is actually the result of omitted variables bias and difficulties in distinguishing between age-period-cohort effects. We correct these problems and use quasi-experimental methods to retest the causal argument for homicide, property, and violent crime. Using a unique data set compiled from multiple sources, we find that abortion legalization did not have any measurable effect on crime 15-20 years later once appropriate controls are included. Our findings indicate that any drop in crime is the result of a mixture of unmeasured period and cohort effects and not abortion.

http://www.demog.berkeley.edu/%7Ebryans/fert_abtn-crime.pdf

Read more...

egretman

Why all these free registrations?
It just leads to frustrations.
And not sell your info to a third party?
Still leaves them treating us as Moriarty
And why do they want our email address
If they aren't going to fill it with their mess
It all seems a little too convenient
May I suggest they be more lenient
If your website is going to be free
Then get out of the way and let me be

RandyfromCanada

l quit and think we should all refuse to particpate in any more reading with "free registation" all every happens is u get spam e-mails

lets all just type in NO MORE .......

Jalden

Yeah, I would like to third posters 1 and 3.

FortyTwo

It wouldn't have mattered if you had registered. I tried to read the article because it looked intriguing, and I didn't mind using one of my lesser email accounts to set up the registration. So, after filling out the forms, logging in, and clicking the link to read the rest of the article, I received the message, "Sorry, that URL was not formed correctly."

I tried using their search feature to access the article by other means, but apparently it's unsearchable, perhaps because its issue date is in April. At any rate, I'm left hanging in what appears to be midsentence, though the four-period ellipsis may indicate that it just trails off....

At any rate, don't bother registering; as someone noted above, it really does just lead to frustration.