A Gluttony Tax

We’ve blogged before about a pay-what-you-wish coffee shop and pay-what-you-wish downloadable music. Now Luciana Silvestri, a reader from Argentina, writes with news of something different: An all-you-can-eat restaurant with a prix fixe twist. As she explains:

A friend has just returned to Argentina from a six-month internship in Chicago and told me about a Japanese restaurant with quite an original pricing system. The restaurant is called Sushi Para II. The address is 2256 N. Clark, Chicago. Apparently, you can consume all the sushi you want for something like $17, but if you leave anything on your plate, you must also pay for leftovers. This creates an incentive to eat a lot but to order in the right measure. I wonder how many people actually accomplish to leave the place with no surcharge AND no tummy ache.

I admit that this is an interesting twist – paying for what you don’t eat. It would be interesting to try this at some of the big Vegas buffets. At those buffets, I also wonder about the difference in consumption between people who pay full price and people who’ve had their meal comped. I am guessing the paying customers eat more – but maybe, just maybe, they also leave more on their plates. I am also guessing that people who pay their garbage bill based on how much garbage they produce each week become less wasteful.

In this environmentally sensitive era, I can imagine this idea — a tax on waste, or wasteful behavior — catching on, and not just in restaurants.

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  1. RandyfromCanada says:

    again worst thing a person can do health wise is over eat …so all this does is encourage you to abuse your body ….
    vegas buffets everyone takes alot becuase it all looks good but honestly 75% of it tastes like crap , so you need to take a lot just to find the 25% that is edible..

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  2. RandyfromCanada says:

    again worst thing a person can do health wise is over eat …so all this does is encourage you to abuse your body ….
    vegas buffets everyone takes alot becuase it all looks good but honestly 75% of it tastes like crap , so you need to take a lot just to find the 25% that is edible..

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  3. kentavos says:

    There’s a sushi restaurant in Newport Beach, CA that has this same rule.

    It definitely prevents you from ordering more than you can eat, but more than anything it forces you to eat everything put in front of you through out the meal.

    Which in a way stifles variety. You fear ordering food you’ve never tried, because if you don’t like it you’re either forced to eat it or pay the penalty.

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  4. kentavos says:

    There’s a sushi restaurant in Newport Beach, CA that has this same rule.

    It definitely prevents you from ordering more than you can eat, but more than anything it forces you to eat everything put in front of you through out the meal.

    Which in a way stifles variety. You fear ordering food you’ve never tried, because if you don’t like it you’re either forced to eat it or pay the penalty.

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  5. msp says:

    An all-you-can-eat sushi and seafood restaurant chain called Todai has an interesting pricing strategy.

    They charge lower prices for children, apparently because children tend to eat less. Moreover, they charge even lower prices for smaller children. Note that their prices for children are based on size (“smaller”) rather than age (“younger”). I presume that they do this because size (Todai uses height as the size measure) is observable, while age is not. My guess is that restaurants with, say, a 12-year-old-and-under pricing policy does not get many 13 year-olds dining there.

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  6. msp says:

    An all-you-can-eat sushi and seafood restaurant chain called Todai has an interesting pricing strategy.

    They charge lower prices for children, apparently because children tend to eat less. Moreover, they charge even lower prices for smaller children. Note that their prices for children are based on size (“smaller”) rather than age (“younger”). I presume that they do this because size (Todai uses height as the size measure) is observable, while age is not. My guess is that restaurants with, say, a 12-year-old-and-under pricing policy does not get many 13 year-olds dining there.

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  7. egretman says:

    I’m having a severe case of deja vu on this. Didn’t you blog about this recently, having to pay for what you don’t eat?

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  8. egretman says:

    I’m having a severe case of deja vu on this. Didn’t you blog about this recently, having to pay for what you don’t eat?

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