The Second Most Popular Baby Name for Boys in the U.K. — you will be surprised

Before reading further, take a guess at what the five most popular baby names for boys were last year in the U.K. If you can guess No. 2, you are bloody brilliant. If you are like me and not so bloody brilliant, you can find the answer here.

(Hat tip to Matt Hawke.)


kentavos

I was guessing Harry in honor of the prince and potter. Shows how well I know British culture and only strengthens Weingarten's argument that locals understand locality better than foreigners.

angelofthenorth

Not surprising at all, although it would be good if they collated more variant names.

The UK has a huge diversity of names - lots of different heritages, and cos we're small, it permeates rapidly.

Alsadius

Nah, that's an easy one - I read Mark Steyn. It's actually #1 in a lot of other European countries. Muslims are a minority, but they have a lot more kids than non-Muslims, and they name them a lot more monolithically(at least, as regards the name Mohammed).

calamityjake

To me, the really amazing thing is that Alfie is in the top 20. I thought it was an unusual name, only well-known because of the eponymous film (and its recent remake). But I suppose British readers are probably not surprised by that.

oddTodd

If the second most popular name was George W., then I'd be surprised!

egretman

I don't think that's a proper use of the word, eponymous. Alfie wasn't a real person.

dix

"Scholars said that the name's rise up the league table was driven partly by the growing number of young Muslims having families"

I might have thought the rise was driven "entirely" by the growing number of young Muslims having families. Unless of course a lot of Anglicans favor the name.

ScottW

And I was hoping for Stephen...

Requis

I'm a bloody genius! Muhammad is the most popular male name in the world.

freetz

Crud, my pick for No. 2 was Mummenschanz.

CollegeCat

I'm surprised it is spelled the way it was. There are differences in spelling depending on the country of origin. I'm guessing to get it to number 2 with that spelling they are grouping all of the Mohammed, Mohamed, Muhammed, and Muhammud's together. I'd be interested to see their methodology.

Kent

I was surprised that "Hank" was all the way down at #9 on the list.

Nathaniel

I might have thought the rise was driven “entirely” by the growing number of young Muslims having families.

Yeah, "partly" by Muslims naming their children? That's like saying pregnancy is "partly" due to sex.

Kent

egretman, you're right. he meant to use the word ubiquitous not eponymous.

user

@ calamityjake (#4).
I have a horrible suspicion that the preponderance of Alfie is due to the character Alfie Moon in the popular soap Eastenders.

calamityjake

@egretman:
I meant eponymous. An eponym is "one for whom or which something is or is believed to be named." In this case, the fictional character Alfie is the eponym, and the film Alfie is the eponymous "something" from the definition above. I should have probably just said "the film starring the character of the same name." But you can't turn back time.

@Kent:
"Ubiquitous" is emphatically not what I meant.

see

I read the headline, and said, "No, I won't. Mohammad."

However, for those of you who were surprised, I assume you'd also be surprised that chicken tikka masala is as standard fare in Britain as pizza is in the U.S.

kentavos

I was guessing Harry in honor of the prince and potter. Shows how well I know British culture and only strengthens Weingarten's argument that locals understand locality better than foreigners.

angelofthenorth

Not surprising at all, although it would be good if they collated more variant names.

The UK has a huge diversity of names - lots of different heritages, and cos we're small, it permeates rapidly.

Alsadius

Nah, that's an easy one - I read Mark Steyn. It's actually #1 in a lot of other European countries. Muslims are a minority, but they have a lot more kids than non-Muslims, and they name them a lot more monolithically(at least, as regards the name Mohammed).