The FREAKest Links: Gaming Teens and E-Mail Stress Edition

Via Wired: In addition to providing potential career-building skills, online gaming may be good for teens, according to a three-year study of adolescent gamers by researchers at Brunel University. The findings showed that teens who gamed could “establish their presence, identity and meaning in ways that might not be accessible or permissible in their everyday lives.” Though there’s also the small matter of more gaming meaning less homework time.

A study by University of Paisley mathematics professor Mario Hair found that e-mail causes a specific type of stress in users, and is more distracting than other forms of communication. Nora Ephron seems to agree.

In a continuation of its ongoing threat to MySpace, Facebook is gaining popularity in the online music scene after joining with iLike, the rapidly growing digital music service that lets users share their music preferences.


discordian

I tried a discussion on a proffesional message board I help mod that playing Dungeons and Dragons in my teens (this is before the advent of PC's, never mind on-line gaming) helped me prepare for a leaderhip role in my career.
It was a lively discussion.
But I really don't see how on-line gaming would do the same unless one thinks leaderhip can take place without the face time.

joeag

iLike was not acquired by Facebook. They are an independant company so far as I know. The article is about the growth of iLike once they created a Facebook app and tapped into the Facebook community.

lermit

Beware of younger people that likes games and truth

.lermit

frankenduf

apparently, W never played diplomacy as a kid (maybe he was a risk fan)

joeag

"gaining popularity in the online music scene after joining with iLike" - still not quite right. There is no "joining".

Facebook created a platform that allows application developers great freedom to create applications that seamlessly integrate with Facebook.

The application developers are all independant companies trying to get their product/service in front of Facebook's huge user base. iLike is one of those developers.

The bigger reason (other than that the subject is music) why this is interesting in the MySpace vs. Facebook battle is that Facebook is taking a very accepting/encouraging stance with outside developers, in contrast to MySpace, which in fact has DIScouraged many app developers from creating apps for MySpace. The smart money in the "web 2.0" world is that Facebook's approach will be the smarter way to go in the end.

discordian

I tried a discussion on a proffesional message board I help mod that playing Dungeons and Dragons in my teens (this is before the advent of PC's, never mind on-line gaming) helped me prepare for a leaderhip role in my career.
It was a lively discussion.
But I really don't see how on-line gaming would do the same unless one thinks leaderhip can take place without the face time.

joeag

iLike was not acquired by Facebook. They are an independant company so far as I know. The article is about the growth of iLike once they created a Facebook app and tapped into the Facebook community.

lermit

Beware of younger people that likes games and truth

.lermit

frankenduf

apparently, W never played diplomacy as a kid (maybe he was a risk fan)

joeag

"gaining popularity in the online music scene after joining with iLike" - still not quite right. There is no "joining".

Facebook created a platform that allows application developers great freedom to create applications that seamlessly integrate with Facebook.

The application developers are all independant companies trying to get their product/service in front of Facebook's huge user base. iLike is one of those developers.

The bigger reason (other than that the subject is music) why this is interesting in the MySpace vs. Facebook battle is that Facebook is taking a very accepting/encouraging stance with outside developers, in contrast to MySpace, which in fact has DIScouraged many app developers from creating apps for MySpace. The smart money in the "web 2.0" world is that Facebook's approach will be the smarter way to go in the end.