The FREAKest Links: Little Shop of Kidneys Edition

Organ donation is heading from a bogus reality show to the big screen: An A.P. article reports that Paris Hilton has landed a role in the movie Repo! The Genetic Opera, a so-called “horror rock” musical that’s “set in a plague-ravaged future where people can purchase new organs on the installment plan from a corporation called Geneco.” Hilton will play the “fame-seeking daughter of Geneco’s owner,” played by Paul Sorvino.

We’ve devoted plenty of time to discussing the effects of individual’s names, but what about the names of companies? De Montfort University finance professor Panagiotis Andrikopoulos has published a study on the “predictive power of corporate name changes on companies’ subsequent long-term stock market performance,” using a sample of 803 company name changes over 15 years. His results indicate that, on average, a name change is viewed as a sign that the company is in trouble (regardless of whether or not it actually is), and the stock price takes a subsequent hit. (Hat tip: John De Palma.)

In response to Levitt’s questioning of the current academic publishing system, reader L. Shane Carlson informed us of his new project, Pronetos.com, an online professor’s network that allows academics to publish papers, receive instant feedback, share podcasts of lectures, and, of course, blog.

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  1. oddTodd says:

    What’s the effect of having a difficult-to-spell-or-pronounce name on professors’ frequency of citation or invitation to conferences?

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  2. oddTodd says:

    What’s the effect of having a difficult-to-spell-or-pronounce name on professors’ frequency of citation or invitation to conferences?

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  3. cthayler says:

    I agree, his name sounds like a disease.

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  4. cthayler says:

    I agree, his name sounds like a disease.

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  5. discordian says:

    lessee….

    I’ve worked for 6 companies so far…

    two had changed their names. While the companies are still in business both of the plants I worked at shut down due to lost business.
    Yhe other four are either thriving or at least maintaining.

    just my personal experience.

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  6. discordian says:

    lessee….

    I’ve worked for 6 companies so far…

    two had changed their names. While the companies are still in business both of the plants I worked at shut down due to lost business.
    Yhe other four are either thriving or at least maintaining.

    just my personal experience.

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0
  7. CDButler says:

    If a company changes its own name, then the company considers itself in trouble already. A name change is expensive and they must thing the benefits will outweight the costs. Simply not being in financial trouble is not enought to run a publicly traded company. There are opportunity costs to consider. What should be a bigger indicator to investors is when a company changes its fiscal year end. This almost always indicates shady business.

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  8. CDButler says:

    If a company changes its own name, then the company considers itself in trouble already. A name change is expensive and they must thing the benefits will outweight the costs. Simply not being in financial trouble is not enought to run a publicly traded company. There are opportunity costs to consider. What should be a bigger indicator to investors is when a company changes its fiscal year end. This almost always indicates shady business.

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0