Cheating Teachers Are a Global Problem

Australia’s National Assessment Program Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) tests have been dogged by controversy this year, proving that teacher cheating isn’t just a problem in the U.S. One teacher was caught changing test answers, while some parents report “being told to keep children with learning difficulties at home on test days.” There are also reports of schools opening the tests early and preparing students accordingly. It sounds like Australia may be in need of some forensic economists. (HT: James Millett)[%comments]

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  1. Mike B says:

    Meh, you might call it cheating, but I call it The White People Method.

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  2. technologist says:

    How would a unionized, government mandated monopoly be sanctioned for condoning cheating?

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  3. Darrell says:

    Second order testing is an unfair way of evaluating teachers (or anyone for that matter).Little correlation with the ability of the teacher.

    I found that it takes me 6 months of working with, over or under an individual before I could begin to evaluate them. (By the way, my most accurate assessments were when I was working under the individual. YMMV)

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  4. Darrell says:

    Second order testing is an unfair way of evaluating teachers (or anyone for that matter). Little correlation with the ability of the teacher.

    I found that it takes me 6 months of working with, over or under an individual before I could begin to evaluate them. (By the way, my most accurate assessments were when I was working under the individual. YMMV)

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  5. AaronS says:

    It seems to me that a very simple way to solve this would be to computerize such tests…and have the computers randomly scramble the questions and the answers. For instance, a test with 50 questions might have as many as 50 x 49 x 48….x1 possible arrangements–just of the questions, let alone the answers!

    No one would be able to overcome that, I don’t think–especially if the questions are sent directly to some centralized location.

    Further, doing it that way might allow us to simply “wait” until EVERYONE had taken the test (overcoming the apparent tendency to keep lower achievers at home).

    If nothing else, having about 20 version of the PAPER test would prove very difficult for teachers to handle, since it would require a slow, manual process.

    SHAME on teachers for doing precisely what they supposedly don’t want students to do!

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  6. Karen says:

    The main cause of the controversy this year is that the federal government have just created a website where the results of every school in the country can be accessed, compared, and which the media have ranked.
    National testing is quite new here and is part of a push to create a national curriculum, the states always having been responsible for education. In NSW we have had had basic skill testing for many years but in the past school results have not been published.
    These national tests are mostly computer marked but include an externally marked writing component, probably the part most open to the temptation for teachers to cheat.
    Unfortunately the inadequacy of our national broadband network does not allow all students to complete tests online simultaneously at this stage. If they are not done at the same time, parents are concerned about passing on of information between students.

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  7. Spooner says:

    AaronS

    Great Idea! I was going to suggest busing the students (or their teachers) to competing schools, but your idea is far superior. (Probably too intelligent ever to be adopted.)

    But I don’t understand why you call “SHAME” on teachers for doing precisely what they are motivated to do.

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  8. Douglas Green says:

    Cheating is small time. Here is a story about a school that shredded tests before they were graded.
    http://bit.ly/c1fdrR

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