Some Other Explanations for Why Public Bathrooms Are the Way They Are

From a podcast listener named Katie McGreer, some really interesting comment on our recent episode “Time to Take Back the Toilet“: I am an avid listener of the Freakonomics podcast and I just wanted to respond to the recent episode on noise in public washrooms (or the lack of buffers).  I was having a discussion […]

Women + Financial Literacy = Bad News

Annamaria Lusardi has been researching financial literacy for years. She has co-authored a new working paper (abstract; PDF) with Tabea Bucher-Koenen, Rob Alessie, and Maarten van Rooij called “How Financially Literate Are Women?” The answer: not very. This has obvious implications not only for something like retirement savings but also the gender pay gap (which […]

Unintended Consequences of Anti-Police Protests in New York

1. According to the New York Post: “The NYPD is pulling detectives from homicides and other investigations to help deal with the endless barrage of anti-cop protests in the city, law-enforcement sources told The Post Monday.” 2. The anti-police protests are, in one way at least, rewarding the very police officers whom the protestors wish […]

Time to Take Back the Toilet Full Transcript

This is a transcript of the Freakonomics Radio podcast “Time to Take Back the Toilet” [MUSIC: Johnny Sangster, “Fastbook”] DUBNER: Hey podcast listeners, before today’s show begins, I want to ask you to think back on all the stories we’ve brought you in the past year. Like when we talked about how failure can be […]

Please Lend Your Voice to an Upcoming Freakonomics Radio Podcast

Would you like to hear your voice on a future Freakonomics Radio episode? Hope so! Here are the details:

We recently put out a two-part episode on education reform, the first on teacher skill and the second on a community-based project called Pathways to Education. The response from listeners was huge -- and, often, very opinionated. It seems as though everyone had a concrete idea for the one thing that would really improve our education system.

So we've decided to make an episode about ... what you think is the one thing that would really improve our education system. If all goes well, the episode will be made up primarily of listeners' voices -- that is, your voice.

How to Fix a Broken High Schooler, in Four Easy Steps Full Transcript

This is a transcript of the Freakonomics Radio podcast “How to Fix a Broken High Schooler, in Four Easy Steps” [MUSIC: Two Dark Birds, “Ill Wind Again” (from Songs For The New)] Carolyn ACKER: My name is Caroline Acker. I was the executive director of the Regent Park Community Health Center. Stephen J. DUBNER: Regent Park, […]

Is America’s Education Problem Really Just a Teacher Problem? Full Transcript

This is a transcript of the Freakonomics Radio podcast “Is America’s Education Problem Really Just a Teacher Problem?” [MUSIC: Glenn Crytzer and his Syncopators, “The Clamjammer” (from Harlem Mad)] JOEL KLEIN: I read somebody said it’s as hard to get into an ed. school in Finland as it is to get into MIT. DUBNER: That’s […]

The Man Who Would Be Everything Full Transcript

This is a transcript of the Freakonomics Radio podcast “The Man Who Would Be Everything” [MUSIC: Seks Bomba, “The Cat” (from Operation B.O.M.B.A.)] Stephen J. DUBNER: On this week’s episode, Boris Johnson drops by to chat about being: Mayor of London; a writer; a great admirer of — and now biographer of — Prime Minister […]

Why Do People Keep Having Children? Full Transcript

This is a transcript of the Freakonomics Radio podcast “Why Do People Keep Having Children?” [MUSIC: Madrona Music, “Stomp It”] EMILY OSTER: My name is Emily Oster, I’m an economist, I work at Brown University. DUBNER: Cool. Let me ask you this easy question, we’ll start. Why do people have kids, Emily? I mean biological […]

Good News For People Who Rely on Movie Reviews

According to a new working paper by Stefano DellaVigna and Johannes Hermle, movie reviews aren't biased by media ownership. The paper is called "Does Conflict of Interest Lead to Biased Coverage? Evidence from Movie Reviews."