Why Family and Business Don’t Mix: A New Marketplace Podcast

Baby, You Can Program My Car: A New Marketplace Podcast

Our latest Freakonomics Radio on Marketplace podcast is called "Baby, You Can Program My Car." Yes, it's about driverless vehicles. (You can download/subscribe at iTunes, get the RSS feed, listen via the media player above, or read the transcript here.)  

I recently had the good fortune to go for a ridealong in a self-driving Cadillac SRX4 with three of the engineers responsible for making it go: Raj Rajkumar, John Dolan, and Jarrod Snider, all key players in the General Motors-Carnegie Mellon Autonomous Driving Collaborative Research Lab. We rode around a large track that the university has built on the site of an abandoned steel plant in Pittsburgh.

What was most remarkable, to me at least, was how unremarkable it felt to ride in a vehicle that no one was steering or braking. In other words, it felt normal -- not like a science experiment or a rocket ride -- and, as amazing a feat of engineering as a driverless car is, I also realized how much of the technology to go driverless already exists in the modern cars we've been driving for years (cameras, sensors, automation, etc.). 

It's Crowded at the Top: A New Marketplace Podcast

Our latest podcast, "Crowded at the Top," presents a surprising explanation for why the U.S. unemployment rate is still relatively high. (You can download/subscribe at iTunes, get the RSS feed, listen via the media player above, or read the transcript.)

It features a conversation with the University of British Columbia economist Paul Beaudry, one of the authors (along with David Green and Benjamin Sand) of a new paper called "The Great Reversal in the Demand for Skill and Cognitive Tasks":

Help Wanted. No Smokers Need Apply: A New Marketplace Podcast

Our latest podcast is called "Help Wanted. No Smokers Need Apply."  (You can download/subscribe at iTunes, get the RSS feed, listen via the media player above, or read the transcript.)

In many states (21, to be precise), it is perfectly legal for an employer to not hire someone who smokes. This might seem understandable, given that health insurance is often coupled to employment, and since healthcare risks and costs are increasingly pooled. And so: if employers can exclude smokers, should they also be able to weed out junk-food lovers or motorcyclists -- or perhaps anyone who wants to have a baby?

The Tax Man Nudgeth: A New Marketplace Podcast

Our latest Freakonomics Radio on Marketplace podcast is called “The Tax Man Nudgeth."  (You can download/subscribe at iTunes, get the RSS feed, listen via the media player above, or read the transcript.)

The U.S. tax code is almost universally seen as onerous and overly complicated. There is always talk in Washington about serious reform -- Michigan Reps. Dave Camp (R.) and Sander Levin (D.) are currently working on it -- but, Washington being Washington, we probably shouldn't hold our breath.

So in this podcast we decided to take a look at the tax code we’re stuck with for now and see if there are some improvements, however marginal, that are worth thinking about. We start by discussing the "tax gap," the huge portion of taxes that simply go uncollected for a variety of reasons. We once wrote about a clever man who helped close the gap a bit. In this episode, former White House economist Austan Goolsbee tells us why the government doesn't try too hard to collect tax on all the cash that sloshes around the economy.

You'll also hear from Dan Ariely, who has an idea for turning the act of paying taxes into a somewhat more satisfying civic duty.

How Money Is March Madness? A New Marketplace Podcast

Our latest Freakonomics Radio on Marketplace podcast is called “How Money Is March Madness?”  (You can download/subscribe at iTunes, get the RSS feed, listen via the media player above, or read the transcript below.)

The gist: the annual NCAA basketball tournament grabs a lot of eyeballs, but turning them into dollars hasn't always been easy -- even when the “talent” is playing for free.

Last year, March Madness reportedly earned its highest TV ratings in 18 years. This year's Super Bowl, meanwhile, was the third most-watched broadcast in TV history (behind two earlier Super Bowls), despite (or because of?) an electrical blackout. Interestingly -- to me, at least -- these two premier TV sporting events are sold very differently: the Super Bowl rotates annually among one of three networks while the NCAA is in the midst of a 14-year contract with CBS and Turner Sports. How does that difference affect ad revenue?

When Is a Negative a Positive? A New Marketplace Podcast

Our latest Freakonomics Radio on Marketplace podcast is called “When Is a Negative a Positive?”  (You can download/subscribe at iTunes, get the RSS feed, listen via the media player above, or read the transcript below.)

So when is a negative a positive? When the negative is feedback. We focus on a clever research project by Ayelet Fishbach of the University of Chicago and Stacey Finkelstein at Columbia. It argues that positive feedback certainly has its role -- especially when someone isn't yet fully invested in a new project or job -- but if it's improvement you're after, then going negative is where it's at:

FISHBACH: The more a person is committed to a goal -- and by that I mean the more someone thinks that they absolutely have to do it, they like doing it, it’s important for them to do it -- the more negative compared with positive feedback will be efficient.

The Downside of More Miles Per Gallon: A New Marketplace Podcast

Our latest Freakonomics Radio on Marketplace podcast is called “The Downside of More Miles Per Gallon." (You can download/subscribe at iTunes, get the RSS feed, listen via the media player above, or read the transcript below.)

The gist: the Federal gas tax is a primary source of infrastructure funding but, politically, it has proven a hard tax to increase. Furthermore, because the tax is a fixed amount (18.4 cents per gallon) rather than a percentage, gas-tax revenues don't rise even when gas prices do -- as has been happening lately.

Even worse, as modern cars travel further on a gallon of gas (good news, right?), they contribute even less money for the roads they travel. And cars are going to get even more fuel-efficient.

So what's to be done? Some politicians want to get rid of gas taxes in favor of an increased sales tax -- which, Eric Morris argues, is a bad idea, since it shifts the burden to non-drivers.

Sure, I Remember That: A New Marketplace Podcast

Our latest Freakonomics Radio on Marketplace podcast is called "Sure, I Remember That." (You can download/subscribe at iTunes, get the RSS feed, listen via the media player in the post, or read the transcript below.) It's about false memory, particularly in the political realm, and how we are more capable of "remembering" an event that never happened if the event happens to synch up with our political ideology.

Introducing "Freakonomics Experiments": A New Marketplace Podcast

Our latest Freakonomics Radio on Marketplace podcast is called “Introducing 'Freakonomics Experiments.'" (You can download/subscribe at iTunes, get the RSS feed, listen via the media player in the post, or read the transcript below.)

In it, Steve Levitt tells Kai Ryssdal about a new website we've just launched that will help you make tough decisions in life while also taking part in academic research. And there's Freakonomics swag to be had, too.

So if you or someone you know has a tough decision to make, head over to FreakonomicsExperiments.com. You can read about  the experimental design and check out the FAQ. For instance:

Q: Just what is Freakonomics Experiments?

A: Freakonomics Experiments is a set of simple experiments about complex issues — whether to break up with your significant other, quit your job, or start a diet, just to name a few.

Sometimes in life you face one of these decisions, and you just don’t know what to do. In the end, whatever you decide will essentially be a flip of a coin. Freakonomics Experiments helps you make the decision by flipping that coin for you. Over the next few months, we’ll then check in with you with surveys and other materials. In turn, you’ll help further scientific research. Unlike most games of chance, participating in this experiment is win-win.