The Harvard President Will See You Now (Rebroadcast)

How a pain-in-the-neck girl from rural Virginia came to run the most powerful university in the world.

“If Mayors Ruled the World”

Season 5, Episode 30 This week, Freakonomics Radio expands on an idea from political theorist Benjamin Barber, who wrote If Mayors Ruled the World: Dysfunctional Nations, Rising Cities. Barber argues that cities are paragons of good governance — compared, at least, to nation-states — and that is largely due to their mayors. Mayors, Barber argues, are can-do people […]

Do Boycotts Work?

At issue: The Montgomery Bus Boycott, the South African divestment campaign, Chick-fil-A! Almost anyone can launch a boycott, and the media loves to cover them. But do boycotts actually produce the change they’re fighting for?

The Harvard President Will See You Now: A New Freakonomics Radio Episode

Our latest Freakonomics Radio episode is called “The President of Harvard Will See You Now.” (You can subscribe to the podcast at iTunes or elsewhere, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above. You can also read the transcript, which includes credits for the music you’ll hear in the episode.) It features an in-depth interview with Drew Gilpin Faust, and explores how a (self-described) "pain-in-the-neck" little girl from rural Virginia came to run the most powerful university in the world.

Aziz Ansari Needs Another Toothbrush

Our latest Freakonomics Radio episode is  "Aziz Ansari Needs Another Toothbrush," in which the comedian, actor -- and now, author -- answers our FREAK-quently Asked Questions. (You can subscribe to the podcast at iTunes or elsewhere, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above. You can also read the transcript, which includes credits for the music you’ll hear in the episode.)

Aziz Ansari is best known for playing Tom Haverford on Parks and Recreation, the NBC sitcom starring Amy Poehler. The show was never a huge hit, but it was beloved -- In part because it was smart but also because (IMHO) the show was, at its core, sweet. Although Ansari's Haverford was perhaps the most selfish and hustle-y character on the show – and yet he too was pretty sweet, deep down.