Brother, Can You Spare a Trill?

Economists Mark J. Kamstra and Robert J. Shiller propose a new tool for government financing: "trills" -- i.e., shares in U.S. GDP.

"And They Invented Math!"

Michael Lewis, who expertly profiled Iceland's collapse last year, has now set his sights on Greece. Lewis chronicles a country accustomed to corruption, handouts, and "breathtaking inefficiency."

Debt as a Drug

Planet Money interviews Nassim Taleb for its Deep Read series. Taleb compares the developed world's dependence on debt to drug addiction.

The National Debt Gets a Big Donor

Hint: it wasn't us.

Directing Your Charity Dollars to the National Debt

Would kind of person is likely to do this?

The Debt Clock

In the spirit of its Big Mac Index, The Economist rolled out its Global Debt Clock, which features a running global-public-debt tally.

Do You Owe $23 Quadrillion?

An unidentified computer glitch has led Visa to overcharge several of its cardholders for routine purchases at drug stores, gas stations, and restaurants, to the tune of $23,148,855,308,184,500.00 each. These charges, as far as we can tell, exceed the sum total of wealth accumulated in human history.

The Self-Serving Policy Proposal Prize

We need a prize for the most self-serving proposal. A lawyer with large student loans has assembled a large group of friends on Facebook with the proposal “Cancel Student Debt to Stimulate the Economy.” Ignoring the fact that this might reduce rather than increase the fiscal stimulus, it would reduce the burden on people who, […]

The Fiendish Genius of Credit-Card Minimum Payments

New research finds that credit-card holders pay down their debts more slowly when their statements suggest a minimum monthly installment. The Economist reports on the study, by University of Warwick psychologist Dr. Neil Stewart: Mr. Stewart presented 413 people with mock credit-card bills of ?435.76 (about $650) that were identical — except that only half […]

Everything You Need to Know About the Financial Crisis: A Guest Post by Diamond and Kashyap

When the financial crisis was just beginning to appear, I did one of the smartest things I’ve ever done: I asked my colleagues Doug Diamond and Anil Kashyap to explain to me what was happening. What they said was so enlightening that I begged them to write it up for the blog, which they did. […]