How to Live Longer: a New Marketplace Podcast

Our latest Freakonomics Radio on Marketplace podcast is called "How to Live Longer." (You can download/subscribe at iTunes, get the RSS feed, listen via the media player in the post, or read the transcript below.)

It looks into why Hall of Fame inductees, Oscar winners, and Nobel laureates seem to outlive their peers. The deeper question in the podcast concerns the relationship between status (not income!) and longevity -- a fascinating, complex, and controversial topic (here's a good place to start reading) about which I believe we'll hear a great deal in years to come. It will be valuable to know what kind of "status boosts" confer health advantages and, conversely, how disappointment and the like can chip away at us.

This podcast was timed to coincide with two events this week: the annual Baseball Hall of Fame election, in which no players were selected this year for the first time since 1996 (here's ESPN's take and here's a useful statistical snapshot); and the announcement of this year's Oscar nominees.

Service as Performance: The "Symbolic Capital" of Turkish Hairdressers

An upcoming article in the Journal of Consumer Research examines class, status, and power in a rather quirky environment: the metropolitan hair salons of Turkey. According to a new paper by Tuba Üstüner and Craig Thompson, getting a haircut might as well mean playing a master chess game - with more style, and a lot more status and class tension. Here's the abstract:

The Boss Effect: Study Shows Chinese Recognize Their Boss's Face Before Their Own

A small study published in the journal PLoS One, titled "Who’s Afraid of the Boss," reveals key cultural differences in the way people react to their superiors. The study notes a particularly stark difference between Chinese and Americans. Researchers in both countries showed subjects a rapid series of photographs, asking them to press a button either when they recognized themselves or their boss. The abstract states:

Human adults typically respond faster to their own face than to the faces of others. However, in Chinese participants, this self-face advantage is lost in the presence of one's supervisor, and they respond faster to their supervisor's face than to their own.

Americans, on the other hand, are predictably different in light of a cultural emphasis on independence rather than collectivism.