Women Who Make More

The first chapter of SuperFreakonomics, and a recent Q&A, addressed the pervasive male-female wage gap, but there does seem to be one subset of women who make more money than their male peers.

SuperFreakonomics Book Club: Ian Horsley Answers Your Questions About the Terrorist Algorithm

In the SuperFreakonomics Virtual Book Club, we invite readers to ask questions of some of the researchers and other characters in our book. Last week, we opened up the questioning for "Ian Horsley," a banker who's been working with Steve Levitt to develop an algorithm to catch terrorists. His answers are below. Thanks to Ian and to all of you for the questions.

SuperFreakonomics Book Club: Can a Banker's Algorithm Help Catch Would-Be Terrorists?

This week we're offering up "Ian Horsley." By day, he is employed in the anti-fraud department of a large British bank; but in his every spare moment for the past few years he has been working hard in collaboration with Steve Levitt to build an algorithm that can identify potential terrorists by their retail banking data.

SuperFreakonomics Book Club: Allie the Escort Answers Your Questions

In the SuperFreakonomics Virtual Book Club, we invite readers to ask questions of some of the researchers and other characters in our book. Last week we opened up the questioning for Allie, a high-end escort whose entrepreneurial skills and understanding of economics made her a financial success.

SuperFreakonomics Book Club: Ask Allie the Escort About Her Work and Life

We have finally reached the end of Chapter 1, which brings us to Allie, the high-end escort whom we profile at some length. She has appeared earlier on this blog, answering some of our questions about the Eliot Spitzer affair. Now is your chance to ask Allie some questions of your own about her life and work as an escort.

SuperFreakonomics Book Club: Goldin and Katz on the Male-Female Wage Gap

In the SuperFreakonomics Virtual Book Club, we invite readers to ask questions of some of the researchers and other characters in our new book. Last week we opened up the questioning for Claudia Goldin and Lawrence Katz, labor economists and experts on the male-female wage gap.

SuperFreakonomics Book Club: Ask Claudia Goldin and Larry Katz About the Male-Female Wage Gap

In the previous installment of our virtual book club, Sudhir Venkatesh answered your questions about his research on street prostitution.

Now, moving on to another section of Chapter One, here's your chance to ask a pair of researchers about a central and pressing fact of U.S. economic life: the enduring wage gap between men and women.

SuperFreakonomics Book Club: Ask Sudhir Venkatesh About Street Prostitution

In the first installment of our virtual book club, Emily Oster answered your questions about her research (co-authored with Rob Jensen) which argues that the lives of rural women in India improved on several dimensions thanks to the widespread adoption of television.

That story appeared in our book's introduction. Now we're moving on to Chapter One. We will probably feature a few Q&A's with the subjects and researchers featured in this chapter, which is described in the Table of Contents like this:

SuperFreakonomics Book Club: Emily Oster Answers Your Questions

Our first guest was University of Chicago economist Emily Oster, whose research, co-authored with Robert Jensen, formed the basis of the section where we discuss how the introduction of television turned out to be an unlikely boon for rural Indian women. (I should have also mentioned that we cite Emily's fascinating research on how women were regularly put to death for centuries on charges of witchcraft.)

Introducing the SuperFreakonomics Virtual Book Club: Meet Emily Oster

Welcome to the first installment of the SuperFreakonomics Book Club. We know you're all busy, and scattered around the globe too. So it wouldn't be convenient for all of us to regularly gather in someone's living room and talk about the book while sharing bean dip. So let's harness this Internet thingy and try something different.

The idea is simple. We'll start at the beginning of the book and work our way to the end, each week giving you a chance to ask questions or leave comments for some of the researchers and other people we write about in SuperFreakonomics.