Suzanne Gluck: “I’m a Person Who Can Convince Other People to Do Things” (People I (Mostly) Admire, Ep. 10)

She might not be a household name, but Suzanne Gluck is one of the most powerful people in the book industry. Her slush pile is a key entry point to the biggest publishers in the U.S., and the authors she represents have sold more than 100 million books worldwide. Steve Levitt talks with Gluck — his own agent — about negotiating a deal, advising prospective authors, and convincing him to co-write Freakonomics.

Why Do We Seek Comfort in the Familiar? (Ep. 445)

In this episode of No Stupid Questions — a Freakonomics Radio Network show launched earlier this year — Stephen Dubner and Angela Duckworth debate why we watch, read, and eat familiar things during a crisis, and if it might in fact be better to try new things instead. Also: is a little knowledge truly as dangerous as they say?

Which Gets You Further: Talent or Effort? (NSQ Ep. 32)

Also: where is the line between acronyms, initialisms, and gibberish?

How Do You Cure a Compassion Crisis? (Ep. 444)

Patients in the U.S. healthcare system often feel they’re treated with a lack of empathy. Doctors and nurses have tragically high levels of burnout. Could fixing the first problem solve the second? And does the rest of society need more compassion too?

How Much Do Your Friends Affect Your Future? (NSQ Ep. 31)

Also: which professions have the happiest people?

Moncef Slaoui: “It’s Unfortunate That It Takes a Crisis for This to Happen” (People I (Mostly) Admire, Ep. 9)

Born in Morocco and raised mostly by a single mother, Moncef Slaoui is now one of the world’s most influential scientists. As the head of Operation Warp Speed — the U.S. government’s Covid-19 vaccine program — Slaoui has overseen the development and distribution of a new vaccine at a pace once deemed impossible. Steve Levitt finds out how the latest generation of vaccines improve on their predecessors, why “educated intuition” is important in innovation, and what we can do to be better prepared for future pandemics.

A Sneak Peek at Biden’s Top Economist (Ep. 443)

The incoming president argues that the economy and the environment are deeply connected. This is reflected in his choice for National Economic Council director — Brian Deese, a climate-policy wonk and veteran of the no-drama-Obama era. But don’t mistake Deese’s lack of drama for a lack of intensity.

Why Do We Seek Comfort in the Familiar? (NSQ Ep. 30)

Also: is a little knowledge truly a dangerous thing?

PLAYBACK (2015): Could the Next Brooklyn Be … Las Vegas?! (Ep. 205)

Tony Hsieh, the longtime C.E.O. of Zappos, was an iconoclast and a dreamer. Five years ago, we sat down with him around a desert campfire to talk about those dreams. Hsieh died recently from injuries sustained in a house fire; he was 46.

Is it Too Late for General Motors to Go Electric? (Ep. 442)

G.M. produces more than 20 times as many cars as Tesla, but Tesla is worth nearly 10 times as much. Mary Barra, the C.E.O. of G.M., is trying to fix that. We speak with her about the race toward an electrified (and autonomous) future, China and Trump, and what it’s like to be the “fifth-most powerful woman in the world.”

How Do You Know When It’s Time to Quit? (NSQ Ep. 29)

Also: why is it so hard to predict success?