Professor Hendryx vs. Big Coal

What happens when a public-health researcher deep in coal country argues that mountaintop mining endangers the entire community? Hint: it doesn’t go very well.

How to Get More Grit in Your Life (Rebroadcast)

The psychologist Angela Duckworth argues that a person’s level of stick-to-itiveness is directly related to their level of success. No big surprise there. But grit, she says, isn’t something you’re born with — it can be learned. Here’s how.

An Egghead’s Guide to the Super Bowl

We assembled a panel of smart dudes—a two-time Super Bowl champ; a couple of NFL linemen, including one who's getting a math Ph.D at MIT, and our resident economist--to tell you what to watch for, whether you're a football fanatic or a total newbie.

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09 02 2009

This Is Your Market on Drugs

Sales of antidepressants remain brisk in spite (or perhaps because) of the recession. Slate reminds us of a decade-old study suggesting that widespread use of mood-lightening drugs could fuel irrational exuberance on Wall Street. If Robert Shiller is right, and market fluctuations...

Did China Eat America’s Jobs?

For years, economists promised that global free trade would be mostly win-win. Now they admit the pace of change has been “traumatic.” This has already led to a political insurrection — so what’s next?

Is the American Dream Really Dead?

Just a few decades ago, more than 90 percent of 30-year-olds earned more than their parents had earned at the same age. Now it’s only about 50 percent. What happened — and what can be done about it?

Trevor Noah Has a Lot to Say

The Daily Show host grew up as a poor, mixed-race South African kid going to three churches every Sunday. So he has a sui generis view of America — especially on race, politics, and religion — and he’s not afraid to speak his mind.

The Men Who Started a Thinking Revolution

Starting in the late 1960s, the Israeli psychologists Amos Tversky and Danny Kahneman began to redefine how the human mind actually works. Michael Lewis’s new book The Undoing Project explains how the movement they started — now known as behavioral economics — has had such a profound effect on academia, governments, and society at large.

How to Become Great at Just About Anything (Rebroadcast)

What if the thing we call “talent” is grotesquely overrated? And what if deliberate practice is the secret to excellence? Those are the claims of the research psychologist Anders Ericsson, who has been studying the science of expertise for decades. He tells us everything he’s learned.

How to Be More Productive (Rebroadcast)

In this busy time of year, we could all use some tips on how to get more done in less time. First, however, a warning: there’s a big difference between being busy and being productive.

Freakonomics Radio’s Little Helper

Hello Freakonomics Radio listener, Ever wonder how the ideas you hear every week on Freakonomics Radio come to life? Our friends at WNYC Studios made a fly-on-the-wall documentary that illuminates the team’s creative process. For holiday fundraising season, we put together a Freakonomics Radio Brainstorming Kit, including a Freakonomics Radio mug and golf balls. To get yours, make a contribution of […]

Bad Medicine, Part 3: Death by Diagnosis

By some estimates, medical error is the third-leading cause of death in the U.S. How can that be? And what's to be done? Our third and final episode in this series offers some encouraging answers.