Is This the Future of Home Excercise?

It’s one man’s invention, called the Shovelglove. Here’s how he came upon it:

It was a rainy Sunday. I hadn’t gone to the gym in over three months, and I was feeling painfully out of shape and antsy to do some kind of exercise. But I didn’t want to go out in the rain, and the prospect of subjecting myself to the boring torture of the gym seemed even drearier. I wanted an exercise I could do right there, in my bedroom, without any fancy equipment.

But I didn’t want to do sit-ups or pushups. I didn’t want to grovel on my stomach on the floor, like some degraded beast. “There must be some kind of movement I can do standing up, with the dignity of a human being,” I thought, “some kind of movement that is natural and interesting, that my body would like to do.”

If you like Seth Roberts and the spirit of self-experimentation, you just might like Reinhard Engels and his Shovelglove.

(H/T: politicalcalculations)

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  1. save_the_rustbelt says:

    For safety purposes, start with an 8 lb. sledge before moving to a 12 or 16 pounder.

    And put a cold can of beer on the sore muscles, then drink the beer.

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  2. save_the_rustbelt says:

    For safety purposes, start with an 8 lb. sledge before moving to a 12 or 16 pounder.

    And put a cold can of beer on the sore muscles, then drink the beer.

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  3. prosa says:

    There’s actually nothing new about doing heavy labor-type activities for exercise purposes. The practice is known as General Physical Preparedness, or GPP.

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  4. prosa says:

    There’s actually nothing new about doing heavy labor-type activities for exercise purposes. The practice is known as General Physical Preparedness, or GPP.

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  5. Cyril Morong says:

    One thing I have done at home is to fill backpacks with books. The try to use the backpacks as dumbells. Backpacks have straps and handles. If you play around with them, you can use them for curls, shoulder presses, etc. if you have a bench, you can do some bench presses (although the weight might not be high enough just from books). If the straps or handles are tough on your hands, you can wear gloves. Maybe not as good as the shoveglove, since these are not natural movements. But if you already have books and backpacks, you can do some weight training at home.

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  6. Cyril Morong says:

    One thing I have done at home is to fill backpacks with books. The try to use the backpacks as dumbells. Backpacks have straps and handles. If you play around with them, you can use them for curls, shoulder presses, etc. if you have a bench, you can do some bench presses (although the weight might not be high enough just from books). If the straps or handles are tough on your hands, you can wear gloves. Maybe not as good as the shoveglove, since these are not natural movements. But if you already have books and backpacks, you can do some weight training at home.

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  7. Raymond says:

    I’m not sure what his issue is with push-ups and sit-ups; I’ve never found them “humiliating” or “bestial” in the least. After all, it’s my floor. Beyond that, I don’t relish the idea of swinging a sledge hammer around my living room, unless I’ve decided to redecorate. Also, I reallly wonder what the torque is doing to his back…

    The back pack idea is good, but has severe limitations in that the average school-grade pack can’t handle enough weight. I have a vest with 50lbs of lead ingots (2.5lbs ea) that allows for any kind of excersise movement, including running. With a rattan stick thru the arm holes I can do curls, etc… All this with no danger of smashing the TV.

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  8. Raymond says:

    I’m not sure what his issue is with push-ups and sit-ups; I’ve never found them “humiliating” or “bestial” in the least. After all, it’s my floor. Beyond that, I don’t relish the idea of swinging a sledge hammer around my living room, unless I’ve decided to redecorate. Also, I reallly wonder what the torque is doing to his back…

    The back pack idea is good, but has severe limitations in that the average school-grade pack can’t handle enough weight. I have a vest with 50lbs of lead ingots (2.5lbs ea) that allows for any kind of excersise movement, including running. With a rattan stick thru the arm holes I can do curls, etc… All this with no danger of smashing the TV.

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