In the Season of Giving: A Hooker Raffle

Here’s a holiday story that is sure to warm the coldest heart. On this website of Dallas call girls (Warning: adult content), an escort named Kayla has rallied her friends to put together a special raffle. As she explains in the note below, the winner of the raffle ($50 per entry, or 3 for $100) gets a session with not just Kayla but as many as 10 of her colleagues, all at once:

I love doing things for charity, I just hate not knowing that the money is actually going to where I want it to. Well it just so happens that I have a very dear family that is dire need of about $1000, about right now. If she does not make these bills by Jan. 3, her and her kids will be homeless. She is not in a position to just go make $150 an hour like most of the ladies round these parts. So here is what we are proposing….

2 Full hours spent with ALL of the participating providers at once.

Providers participating so far:

Me
Cathy
Claire
TNT Angie
Sara Goddess of pleasure
Passion Kitten

We are all giving our time to do this. None of the money donated will go to any one of us. It is all meant for the family in need.

Think on it. A chance to make a difference in an entire family’s life, and a chance to spend 2 hours (sometime in January) with all of us at once.

Judging from the comments section of the post, I have a feeling that Kayla and her friends are going to raise a lot more than $1,000.

It is interesting Kayla has the same concern about charity that so many other people have — that they aren’t comfortable that the money raised is going directly to the needy cause. I was having this discussion just yesterday with a friend who wants to start a new “microcharity” initiative, not so different from Muhammad Yunus’s microcredit efforts, designed to get small charitable donations directly to the people who need them. I think this is a hugely promising idea. Of course, the money needn’t always be raised through prostitution.

(Hat tip to a reader who, for some strange reason, wishes to remain anonymous.)


mister79

Your friend's idea is a great one, and there's already a group implementing it. Check out www.modestneeds.org.

dgou

Another stellar charity is Brother's Brother.
http://www.brothersbrother.org

For their efficiency awards, check out:
http://www.brothersbrother.org/award.htm

JoeKeeley

That raffle now includes twelve (12) women. Ho! Ho! Ho! . . .

However, the entry fee is requested by cash or a money order (leaving the payee blank) to a PO Box. I understand the organizer not wanting to give her home address or the recipient's name out, but it could be fishy (don't go there)!

If their effort is sincere, God bless 'em.

socialismisevil

great ides.
But to realy make a differnece we should use the same force to get the politicans to give us our money back so that we may contribute this way and leave their inefficent butts out of it

editorguy

By writing that "I just hate not knowing that the money is actually going to where I want it to," Kayla is tapping into an enormous, sweeping trend in philanthropy -- giving that is oriented to results.

There are the big guys (Gates and Ford foundations), but the best place to see this in action (aside from Yunus's microcredit efforts) is with newer companies like Geneva Global (based near Philadelphia; www.genevaglobal.com) which has pioneered what they call "Performance Philanthropy." They see themselves as an investment bank of sorts, where the payoff is not dollars but rather a measurable number of lives changed.

There's also www.Kiva.org, a Web-based donor portal which matches givers with recipients. They were featured in Sunday's NYTimes magazine for its "great ideas of the year" issue.

jbailey

There's another similar website for school projects: http://www.donorschoose.org

pepsicola

Wow what losers! None of the girls are even hot, so its not even worth it.

PanMan

I just ran into http://www.kiva.org/ this week, who do person-to-person micro credits, over the web. I think it's a great idea, to couple richer people directly to those in need, using the web. Makes the whole thing way less anonymous than just donating to some charity. And you have a (big, according to them), chance of getting your money back. They start at just $25.

NotChuck

Is anyone else curious about:
1) Why Mr. Dubner is looking at prostitute ads in Dallas?
2) The coincidence of the placement of that article just after the article about why no women were in the sciences?

mister79

Your friend's idea is a great one, and there's already a group implementing it. Check out www.modestneeds.org.

dgou

Another stellar charity is Brother's Brother.
http://www.brothersbrother.org

For their efficiency awards, check out:
http://www.brothersbrother.org/award.htm

JoeKeeley

That raffle now includes twelve (12) women. Ho! Ho! Ho! . . .

However, the entry fee is requested by cash or a money order (leaving the payee blank) to a PO Box. I understand the organizer not wanting to give her home address or the recipient's name out, but it could be fishy (don't go there)!

If their effort is sincere, God bless 'em.

socialismisevil

great ides.
But to realy make a differnece we should use the same force to get the politicans to give us our money back so that we may contribute this way and leave their inefficent butts out of it

editorguy

By writing that "I just hate not knowing that the money is actually going to where I want it to," Kayla is tapping into an enormous, sweeping trend in philanthropy -- giving that is oriented to results.

There are the big guys (Gates and Ford foundations), but the best place to see this in action (aside from Yunus's microcredit efforts) is with newer companies like Geneva Global (based near Philadelphia; www.genevaglobal.com) which has pioneered what they call "Performance Philanthropy." They see themselves as an investment bank of sorts, where the payoff is not dollars but rather a measurable number of lives changed.

There's also www.Kiva.org, a Web-based donor portal which matches givers with recipients. They were featured in Sunday's NYTimes magazine for its "great ideas of the year" issue.

jbailey

There's another similar website for school projects: http://www.donorschoose.org

pepsicola

Wow what losers! None of the girls are even hot, so its not even worth it.

PanMan

I just ran into http://www.kiva.org/ this week, who do person-to-person micro credits, over the web. I think it's a great idea, to couple richer people directly to those in need, using the web. Makes the whole thing way less anonymous than just donating to some charity. And you have a (big, according to them), chance of getting your money back. They start at just $25.

NotChuck

Is anyone else curious about:
1) Why Mr. Dubner is looking at prostitute ads in Dallas?
2) The coincidence of the placement of that article just after the article about why no women were in the sciences?