The FREAKest Links: Smaller Homes, Free Burritos, and the Price of Death Edition

Bad news for retirees (and others) who want gigantic houses in Boulder, Colo.: local officials may enact home size restrictions. Under the proposal, residents would be allowed to build homes larger than 4,000 square feet only if they agree to invest in the preservation of agricultural or rural land in other regions. (Hat tip: J.C. O’Connell.)

Here’s more on the thin line between incentivizing and compensating blood donors: the Music Saves Lives blood drive is offering backstage concert passes and free Chipotle burritos to people who donate. (Hat tip: Jessica Ross.)

To assist courts in determining damages for the loss of a loved one, British economists Andrew Oswald and Nattavudh Powdthavee have developed a system of assigning dollar values to the deaths of spouses and family members. They reached their conclusions by reviewing British Household Panel Surveys of 10,000 people since 1991. The results? $220,000 for a spouse, $118,000 for a child, $28,000 for a parent, and $2,000 for a sibling.


yoshi

Home size restrictions are being looked at everywhere. In Minneapolis the issue has been buyers buying a house in older neighborhoods, tearing down the house, and building a house that takes up the entire lot.

A new law was passed by the city council two weeks ago that places restrictions.

http://www.startribune.com/462/story/1276799.html

(also note that Boulder places restrictions on everything - it is, after all, the Mountain states version of Berkeley)

jeffstier

Well, I must admit, even without being able to use the Reebok Club passes as an incentive, more than 115 people have already registered for the July 16th blood drive, making it likely to be the largest mobile blood drive in the history of the New York Blood Center.

Perhaps the Ben and Jerry's "pint for a pint" coupons are working! And we haven't even advertised the $5.00 Starbucks gift card.

We still have plenty left for those who register in advance at: http://angelsinwaiting.org/savethedate2007.html

popsfr

Note that the "Price of Death" amounts represent the average additional income required >per year

mjsohbet

thanks

Sarah

http://www.physorg.com/news103120737.html

"...China has about 1.3 billion people, 20 percent of the world's total. The government has pledged to keep the population under 1.36 billion in 2010, and under 1.45 billion in 2020.

But rising incomes mean some newly rich can afford to break the rules and pay resulting fines. In April, the government said it would crack down on rich lawbreakers with bigger fines."

In many Western countries, there is no official fine for having more children, yet the birth rate is well below 2; a common reason given is the cost of getting children to adulthood (at a desired standard of living)...

In China, is having more than one child a status symbol of wealth?

Sarah

frankenduf

the vulgar exchange should take age into account- x bucks per year

yoshi

Home size restrictions are being looked at everywhere. In Minneapolis the issue has been buyers buying a house in older neighborhoods, tearing down the house, and building a house that takes up the entire lot.

A new law was passed by the city council two weeks ago that places restrictions.

http://www.startribune.com/462/story/1276799.html

(also note that Boulder places restrictions on everything - it is, after all, the Mountain states version of Berkeley)

jeffstier

Well, I must admit, even without being able to use the Reebok Club passes as an incentive, more than 115 people have already registered for the July 16th blood drive, making it likely to be the largest mobile blood drive in the history of the New York Blood Center.

Perhaps the Ben and Jerry's "pint for a pint" coupons are working! And we haven't even advertised the $5.00 Starbucks gift card.

We still have plenty left for those who register in advance at: http://angelsinwaiting.org/savethedate2007.html

popsfr

Note that the "Price of Death" amounts represent the average additional income required >per year

mjsohbet

thanks

Sarah

http://www.physorg.com/news103120737.html

"...China has about 1.3 billion people, 20 percent of the world's total. The government has pledged to keep the population under 1.36 billion in 2010, and under 1.45 billion in 2020.

But rising incomes mean some newly rich can afford to break the rules and pay resulting fines. In April, the government said it would crack down on rich lawbreakers with bigger fines."

In many Western countries, there is no official fine for having more children, yet the birth rate is well below 2; a common reason given is the cost of getting children to adulthood (at a desired standard of living)...

In China, is having more than one child a status symbol of wealth?

Sarah

frankenduf

the vulgar exchange should take age into account- x bucks per year