Chris Greenaway

Ignoring for a minute the claim that "only true fans" should be the ones able to buy the tickets - if the promoters sold tickets via auction then this problem wouldn't occur. Presumably most people buying tickets for a Rage Against The Machine concert are fans: I can't see it being used as a corporate event.
If I'm prepared to pay more for a ticket than someone else then I should go rather than them. We use money to allocate resources - why not for concert tickets?
The promoters would make more money and there would be no scalping.

Montag

Chris:

Perhaps it is because bands don't want only the richest people to attend their concerts? I'm not sure if that would actually happen for big shows, but it would definitely happen for small venues with only a few hundred tickets sold.

-Montag

frankenduf

i think ticketmaster should be able to buy every single ticket, and then gouge the fans by charging a ghost tax- oh wait a minute...

g p burdell

Montag - i don't think that being a real fan is a requirement to go to a show. further, i'm sure some of the folks buying those tickets from scalpers aren't rich at all.

the bands then should figure out some way to keep the price down and only allow their fans to come to the show. i seriously doubt there is a solution (maybe some radio contests where you could win tickets for band triva knowledge - but that wouldn't work on a large scale).

Phish used to pre-sell tickets by mail to those on their list. it worked, i think because the effort to get the tickets was significant. they still had scalpers, though.

otherwise, chris is 100% correct. if the market value of the ticket is $500, then the band, promoters, venue, etc. are missing out on what the scalpers are making.

Chris Greenaway

Ignoring for a minute the claim that "only true fans" should be the ones able to buy the tickets - if the promoters sold tickets via auction then this problem wouldn't occur. Presumably most people buying tickets for a Rage Against The Machine concert are fans: I can't see it being used as a corporate event.
If I'm prepared to pay more for a ticket than someone else then I should go rather than them. We use money to allocate resources - why not for concert tickets?
The promoters would make more money and there would be no scalping.

Montag

Chris:

Perhaps it is because bands don't want only the richest people to attend their concerts? I'm not sure if that would actually happen for big shows, but it would definitely happen for small venues with only a few hundred tickets sold.

-Montag

frankenduf

i think ticketmaster should be able to buy every single ticket, and then gouge the fans by charging a ghost tax- oh wait a minute...

g p burdell

Montag - i don't think that being a real fan is a requirement to go to a show. further, i'm sure some of the folks buying those tickets from scalpers aren't rich at all.

the bands then should figure out some way to keep the price down and only allow their fans to come to the show. i seriously doubt there is a solution (maybe some radio contests where you could win tickets for band triva knowledge - but that wouldn't work on a large scale).

Phish used to pre-sell tickets by mail to those on their list. it worked, i think because the effort to get the tickets was significant. they still had scalpers, though.

otherwise, chris is 100% correct. if the market value of the ticket is $500, then the band, promoters, venue, etc. are missing out on what the scalpers are making.