Will Frank Warren Spill His Secrets? Bring Your Questions for the “PostSecret” Guy

Frank WarrenCourtesy of HarperCollins

In 2004, Frank Warren, the owner of a medical information company in Germantown, Md., had an idea for a project. He bought 3,000 blank postcards and wrote two things on the back: his home address and an invitation to anonymously share a secret. He passed the cards out on the street, stuck them in library books, left them behind in coffee shops; he didn’t put stamps on them. When 100 cards came back to him, he turned them into an art exhibit in Washington, D.C. Then he created a blog to display them all. He called it PostSecret.

For the next two years, the postcards kept pouring in, containing everything from confessions of extramarital affairs to career disappointments to thoughts of suicide. Warren eventually accumulated more than 175,000 post-secrets from all over the world, which he turned into more art exhibits and also compiled as several best-selling books, including PostSecret, My Secret, and his newest, A Lifetime of Secrets.

As for the blog, it’s become one of the world’s most popular, with more than 3 million unique visitors a month.

Now Warren has agreed to spill his secrets (some of them, at least) to readers of our blog. Write in your questions below, and we’ll post Warren’s answers (to some of them, at least) within the next few days. Thanks in advance to Frank and all of you.

Addendum: You can read the answers to these questions here.

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  1. Jesse Silverglate says:

    Did people share any positive secrets or was everything people shared negative? I wonder if people only feel a need to confess what makes them feel guilty?

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  2. Jesse Silverglate says:

    Did people share any positive secrets or was everything people shared negative? I wonder if people only feel a need to confess what makes them feel guilty?

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  3. Mike Palmer says:

    Two questions:

    1. So far you’ve kept PostSecret an ad-free site. As your page views go up, the expenses must also be going up. Do you foresee a day when you’ll need to run ads?

    2. I’ve often wished there was a PostSecret archive. I know you must have given that some thought. Why isn’t there an archive?

    Thanks!

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  4. Mike Palmer says:

    Two questions:

    1. So far you’ve kept PostSecret an ad-free site. As your page views go up, the expenses must also be going up. Do you foresee a day when you’ll need to run ads?

    2. I’ve often wished there was a PostSecret archive. I know you must have given that some thought. Why isn’t there an archive?

    Thanks!

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  5. Estoban says:

    What is your secret?

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  6. Estoban says:

    What is your secret?

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  7. mgroves says:

    I love PostSecret, but I always wonder how many of the “secrets” are fake? I can’t think of a reason why they would be–the anonymity seems to remove any incentive that I can think of. What do you (Warren) think the percentage of fake ‘secrets’ is?

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  8. mgroves says:

    I love PostSecret, but I always wonder how many of the “secrets” are fake? I can’t think of a reason why they would be–the anonymity seems to remove any incentive that I can think of. What do you (Warren) think the percentage of fake ‘secrets’ is?

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