The Perfect Crime: A New Freakonomics Radio Podcast

This week's podcast is called "The Perfect Crime": in it, Stephen Dubner describes a way to kill someone without any punishment. (You can subscribe to the podcast at iTunes, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above. You can also read the transcript, which includes credits for the music you’ll hear in the episode.) But let's be clear: Dubner isn't suggesting that anyone actually try this. In fact, the problem is that too many people are doing it already.

So what's "the perfect crime"? It turns out that if you are driving your car and run over a pedestrian, there's a good chance -- especially if you live in New York -- that you'll barely be punished. Why?

We hear from Lisa Smith, a former prosecutor and now a law professor, who tells us that just 5 percent of the New York drivers who are involved in a fatal crash with a pedestrian are arrested. As it happens, New York has particularly narrow standards for conviction in such cases; there is a lot of variance among states.

How Is a Bad Radio Station Like Our Public-School System? A Freakonomics Radio Podcast Encore

Our recent podcast “Weird Recycling” looked at ways to reuse things that most people don't think are reusable, like chicken feet and nuclear waste. This week, we’re taking our own advice, and updating a program we did a while back. It's called "How Is a Bad Radio Station Like Our Public-School System?" and it focuses on what you might call the thrill of customization — that is, how technology increasingly enables each of us to get what we want out of life. (You can download/subscribe at iTunes, get the RSS feed, listen live via the media player above, or read the transcript below.)

The main focus of the episode is a fascinating New York City Department of Education pilot program called School of One, which customizes the classroom experience for each student.