These Shoes Are Killing Me!

The human foot is an evolutionary masterpiece, far more functional than we give it credit for. So why do we encase it in “a coffin” (as one foot scholar calls it) that stymies so much of its ability — and may create more problems than it solves?

Why Is My Life So Hard?

Season 6, Episode 40 This week on Freakonomics Radio: most of us feel we face more obstacles than everyone else — which breeds resentment. We also undervalue the tailwinds that help us — which leaves us ungrateful and unhappy. Stephen J. Dubner asks, “How can we avoid this trap?” To find out more, check out the […]

Why Is My Life So Hard?

Most of us feel we face more headwinds and obstacles than everyone else — which breeds resentment. We also undervalue the tailwinds that help us — which leaves us ungrateful and unhappy. How can we avoid this trap?

Athletes’ Feats: TMSIDK Episode 8

For our sports-themed episode, we left out all the tired cliches and instead jammed it full of odd trophies, hidden advantages, surprising innovations and... Trouble with a capital T.

Should Kids Pay Back Their Parents for Raising Them?

Season 6, Episode 2 This week on Freakonomics Radio: When one athlete turned pro, his mom asked him for $1 million. Our modern sensibilities tell us she doesn’t have a case. But does she? Plus, Steve Levitt talks about what he learned from his dad, good and bad. Next, Stephen Dubner shares one of the best lessons he ever learned, […]

Why America Doesn’t Love Soccer (Yet): A New Freakonomics Radio Podcast

With the 2014 World Cup getting underway in Brazil, we've just released an episode called “Why America Doesn’t Love Soccer (Yet).” (You can subscribe to the podcast at iTunes, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above. You can also read the transcript, which includes credits for the music you’ll hear in the episode.)

The episode tries to answer a few questions:

1. Why doesn’t America love soccer the way the rest of the world does?

2. Would that change if the U.S. ever managed to win a World Cup?

3. Is No. 2 possible without No. 1?

Who Stole All the Runs in Major League Baseball?

Last night, Roy Halladay of the Philadelphia Phillies pitched just the second post-season no-hitter in Major League Baseball history. Yes, it's an amazing feat. And yes, it's surprising. But if there were ever a season during which this feat might seem a bit less surprising, it's this year.

World Cup Edition

World Cup Edition: Steve Levitt on why the center cannot hold in penalty kicks, why a running track hurts home-field advantage, and why the World Cup is an economist’s dream. We’ve got a new Freakonomics Radio podcast for you. (Download/subscribe at iTunes here, get the RSS feed here, read the transcript here, or listen live […]