What's That Database Worth?

Laura Meckler of the Wall Street Journal investigates the value and possible future uses of President Obama's massive "data trove."  Here's a quick rundown of the data at stake:

Mr. Obama's campaign collected 13.5 million email addresses in the 2008 election, according to people who worked on the effort. Officials say the list has grown since then, but officials won't say by how much.

The campaign also has lists of volunteers, including the names of neighborhood team leaders who were the most active supporters. A donor database has names of millions of people who made small campaign contributions. Campaigns aren't legally required to report the names of people who give less than $200 total, and these donors haven't been made public.

Meckler reports that Obama's staff plans to enlist supporters' help in getting the President's agenda passed, but is still debating what to do with the data over the long-term.

What Do the Election Results Mean for I.P.?

In the wake of President Obama's solid re-election victory last night, we are left wondering (geeks that we are) about what (if anything) an Obama second term suggests about the future of IP law.  We'll talk mostly about copyright policy here: Any action on IP policy in the next couple of Congresses would probably focus on copyright, not least because we've just been through a substantial reform of the patent law and no one has any appetite to revisit that right away.

Even focusing only on copyright, the picture is far from clear.  Millions of people joined in a wave of online activism back in January to defeat the copyright expansions offered in the SOPA and PIPA bills.  But the coalition that defeated SOPA and PIPA is new and no one's sure whether it's a one-off or the beginning of a broader movement to slow, stop, or even reverse copyright's relentless expansion. We'd note also that two of the entertainment industry's favorite people in the House, Reps. Howard Berman and Mary Bono Mack, were both defeated last night. We doubt the losses have much to do with the pair's outspoken copyright maximalism, but losing Berman and Bono is a further blow to a pro-copyright side that is still getting its collective head around the SOPA/PIPA debacle.

Dear Marijuana and Crime Researchers: Start Your Engines

Yes, it could all go up in smoke -- legal challenges, including from the Federal government, and all that -- but among the interesting developments from last night's election (do yourself a favor and look at this map) is the news that Colorado and Washington voters chose to legalize marijuana. Here's how the issue was phrased on the Colorado ballot:

Shall there be an amendment to the Colorado constitution concerning marijuana, and, in connection therewith, providing for the regulation of marijuana; permitting a person twenty-one years of age or older to consume or possess limited amounts of marijuana; providing for the licensing of cultivation facilities, product manufacturing facilities, testing facilities, and retail stores; permitting local governments to regulate or prohibit such facilities; requiring the general assembly to enact an excise tax to be levied upon wholesale sales of marijuana; requiring that the first $40 million in revenue raised annually by such tax be credited to the public school capital construction assistance fund; and requiring the general assembly to enact legislation governing the cultivation, processing, and sale of industrial hemp?

Candy We Still Believe In: A Halloween Experiment

Instead of trick or treat, how about treatment or control? We conducted two new studies on my porch this year for Halloween. Unfortunately, the mayor of New Haven recommended that people delay trick-or-treating post-Sandy even though the neighborhood was in good shape. This caused lots of confusion, and a turnout of half of the normal turnout of 600 or so kids. So sample size is down, standard errors up.

Alas, two nice results. Both written up in one-page one-graph papers.

Why America’s Economic Growth May Be (Shh!) Over: a New Marketplace Podcast

With the Presidential debate finished, we are officially in the final lap of America's second-favorite spectator sport. (Yes, football is better than politics.) Of all the talking that Barack Obama and Mitt Romney will do by Nov. 6, you can bet that a great deal of their breath will be expended on economic matters. Because that's what the President of the United States does, right -- runs our economy?

Well, actually, no. The President has far less influence over the economy than people tend to think -- as we've pointed out not once, or twice, but three times.

That, of course, won't stop the candidates from talking about their plans to "fix" or "heal" or "restore" our economy -- all of which imply that we are in an economic doldrums that is sure to pass. But what if it doesn't? What if the massive economic growth the U.S. has experienced through most of our history is a thing of the past?

That's the topic of our latest Freakonomics Radio on Marketplace podcast. (You can download/subscribe at iTunes, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player in the post.)

How Much Does Campaign Spending Influence the Election? A Freakonomics Quorum

We have long argued (most recently in this Marketplace podcast) that campaign spending isn't nearly as influential in elections as the conventional wisdom holds.

This week, with the G.O.P. presidential hopefuls in South Carolina spending lots of money (and time and effort) and everyone's talking about "super PAC" spending, we thought it was a good occasion to air this question out further. We've convened a Freakonomics Quorum on the topic, soliciting replies from a few folks with expertise in the realm. Thanks to all of them for participating.