Chinese Jobs Lost, and Gained

"White Guy in a Tie" events in China.

Why is Bristol the Center of Sports Television?

Here is part four of the WSHU "Better Biz" series, where Barry Nalebuff and Ian Ayres react to the challenges of specific businesses.

Can a Sports Drink Improve Your SAT Score?

Here is part three of the WSHU "Better Biz" series, where Barry Nalebuff and I react to the challenges of specific businesses.

"Better Biz" Goes Boating

Here is part two of the WSHU "Better Biz" series, in which Barry Nalebuff and I react to the challenges of specific businesses. In this segment, we talk about the super-cool travel site Kayak.

"Better Biz" at the Whistle Stop Bakery

WSHU, a public radio station in Connecticut, is running a six-part "Better Biz" series, where Barry Nalebuff and I react to the challenges of specific businesses.

Radical Reform of Executive Pay

The recent proposal by the Fed to regulate bankers' compensation practices is understandable given the events of the past two years, but setting caps on salaries and bonuses misses the fundamental problem of compensation on Wall Street. Despite the public resentment surrounding finance-industry payouts, the fact is that no one objects to paying for performance. We just want to make sure we're not getting fleeced or paying for pure dumb luck, and this is where the problem lies.

Craigslist: A Company of Makers

As people who hate meetings, we were particularly taken with one paragraph from this wonderful piece on the unlikely success of Craigslist.

A Profile of the Smile Train founder

This month's Harvard magazine has a nice piece on the founder of the Smile Train, Brian Mullaney.

I love the way he runs his organization, and the way he tells it like it is.

Secret Starbucks

For years, as its stores spread like kudzu across the country, Starbucks was accused of driving neighborhood coffee shops out of business. In most cases, it seems to have done exactly the opposite. In recent times, the Seattle-based company is in retreat, having closed hundreds of stores and laying off thousands of employees. But now it's making a crafty move on its community competitors.

Sin-Vestments

American and international health insurers hold $4.5 billion worth of stock in tobacco companies, a new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine finds. The study's co-author says the stock holdings represent a conflict of interest: "If you own a billion dollars [of tobacco stock], then you don't want to see it go down.... You are less likely to join anti-tobacco coalitions, endorse anti-tobacco legislation, basically, anything most health companies would want to participate in."