The Demonization of Gluten

Celiac disease is thought to affect roughly one percent of the population. The good news: it can be treated by quitting gluten. The bad news: many celiac patients haven’t been diagnosed. The weird news: millions of people without celiac disease have quit gluten – which may be a big mistake.

The Perfect Potato Chip, the Origin of Seltzer, and Why We Eat “Beef” and Not “Cow”: TMSIDK Episode 29

Alex Guarnaschelli (Iron Chef America and Chopped) is our special guest co-host, with Sean Rameswaram (Radiolab Presents: More Perfect) as real-time fact-checker. Tell Me Something I Don't Know explores the origins of food words, children's menus, and seltzer.

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Money (But Were Afraid to Ask)

Season 7, Episode 4 The bad news: roughly 70 percent of Americans are financially illiterate. The good news: all the important stuff can fit on one index card. This week on Freakonomics Radio: how to become your own financial superhero. Plus: Stephen J. Dubner brings you the tale of the $15 tomato. To find out more, […]

Food + Science = Victory!

Season 6, Episode 43 This week on Freakonomics Radio: a full menu of goodies. First up: a nutrition detective. And then, Stephen J. Dubner explores the war on sugar. To find out more, check out the podcasts from which this hour was drawn: “Food + Science = Victory!” and “There’s A War On Sugar. Is It Justified?” […]

Food + Science = Victory! (Rebroadcast)

A kitchen wizard and a nutrition detective talk about the perfect hamburger, getting the most out of garlic, and why you should use vodka in just about everything.

There’s A War On Sugar. Is It Justified?

Some people argue that sugar should be regulated, like alcohol and tobacco, on the grounds that it’s addictive and toxic. How much sense does that make? We hear from a regulatory advocate, an evidence-based skeptic, a former FDA commissioner — and the organizers of Milktoberfest.

Is It Okay for Restaurants to Racially Profile Their Employees?

Season 6, Episode 5 This week on Freakonomics Radio:  We seem to have decided that ethnic food tastes better when it’s served by people of that ethnicity (or at least something close). Does this make sense — and is it legal? Host Stephen Dubner speaks with the owners of Elizabeth’s Neighborhood Table, which serves “thoughtful […]

Is It Okay for Restaurants to Racially Profile Their Employees? (Rebroadcast)

We seem to have decided that ethnic food tastes better when it’s served by people of that ethnicity (or at least something close). Does this make sense — and is it legal?

Why You Should Bribe Your Kids: A New Freakonomics Radio Podcast

This week’s episode is called “Why You Should Bribe Your Kids.” (You can subscribe to the podcast at iTunes, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above. You can also read the transcript, which includes credits for the music you’ll hear in the episode.)

Let's say you're trying to get a bunch of kids to eat more nutritious food. What's the best way to do this -- education, moral urging, or plain old bribery? That's one of the questions that a pair of economists set out to answer in a recent field experiment in Chicago. In this podcast, you'll hear from both of them: John List, a University of Chicago professor (and co-author of The Why Axis who's familiar to readers of this blog); and Anya Samek, who teaches at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

How to Think Like a Freak — and Other FREAK-quently Asked Questions: A New Freakonomics Radio Podcast

Our latest podcast is called "How to Think Like a Freak -- and Other FREAK-quently Asked Questions."  (You can subscribe to the podcast at  iTunes, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above. You can also read the transcript, which includes credits for the music you’ll hear in the episode.) In it, we talk about the imminent release of our new book, Think Like a Freak, and field reader questions about prestige, university life, and (yum yum) bacon. Along the way, we touch upon Michelangelo, George Bernard Shaw, and Steve Levitt's deep disdain of book tours:

LEVITT: I don’t know why but there’s something about book tours, which undo me. I just become dark.