The Future (Probably) Isn’t as Scary as You Think

Internet pioneer Kevin Kelly tries to predict the future by identifying what’s truly inevitable. How worried should we be? Yes, robots will probably take your job — but the future will still be pretty great.

The Three Hardest Words in the English Language

Season 5, Episode 29

This week on Freakonomics Radio we ask: what are the three hardest words to say? Conventional wisdom suggests “I love you.” But c'mon, people say that all the time. What about “I don’t know?" We'll argue that our inability to say these words more often can have huge consequences.

Then, Stephen Dubner talks with Kevin Kelly, a self-described old hippie and onetime editor of hippiedom’s do-it-yourself bible, The Whole Earth Catalog, who went on to co-found Wired magazine, a beacon of the digital age.

Aziz Ansari Needs Another Toothbrush

Our latest Freakonomics Radio episode is  "Aziz Ansari Needs Another Toothbrush," in which the comedian, actor -- and now, author -- answers our FREAK-quently Asked Questions. (You can subscribe to the podcast at iTunes or elsewhere, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above. You can also read the transcript, which includes credits for the music you’ll hear in the episode.)

Aziz Ansari is best known for playing Tom Haverford on Parks and Recreation, the NBC sitcom starring Amy Poehler. The show was never a huge hit, but it was beloved -- In part because it was smart but also because (IMHO) the show was, at its core, sweet. Although Ansari's Haverford was perhaps the most selfish and hustle-y character on the show – and yet he too was pretty sweet, deep down.

Someone Else’s Acid Trip: A New Freakonomics Radio Podcast

At first glance, Kevin Kelly is a contradiction: a self-described old hippie and onetime editor of hippiedom’s do-it-yourself bible, The Whole Earth Catalog, who went on to co-found Wired magazine, a beacon of the digital age.

In our latest edition of FREAK-quently Asked Questions, Kelly sits down with Stephen Dubner to explain himself; the episode is called "Someone Else's Acid Trip." (You can subscribe to the podcast at iTunes, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above. You can also read the transcript, which includes credits for the music you’ll hear in the episode.)

Kelly argues that there is in fact little contradiction between his past and present.