The Taboo Trifecta

Serial entrepreneur Miki Agrawal loves to talk about the bodily functions that make most people flinch. That’s why she’s building a business around the three P’s: periods, pee, and poop.

The Longest Long Shot

On this week's Freakonomics Radio: When the uncelebrated Leicester City Football Club won the English Premier League, it wasn’t just the biggest underdog story in recent history. It was a sign of changing economics — and that other impossible, wonderful events might be lurking just around the corner.

Why America Doesn’t Love Soccer (Yet): A New Freakonomics Radio Podcast

With the 2014 World Cup getting underway in Brazil, we've just released an episode called “Why America Doesn’t Love Soccer (Yet).” (You can subscribe to the podcast at iTunes, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above. You can also read the transcript, which includes credits for the music you’ll hear in the episode.)

The episode tries to answer a few questions:

1. Why doesn’t America love soccer the way the rest of the world does?

2. Would that change if the U.S. ever managed to win a World Cup?

3. Is No. 2 possible without No. 1?

The NFL’s Best Real Estate Isn’t for Sale. Yet.

he NFL's Best Real Estate Isn't For Sale. Yet.: The NFL is very good at making money. So why on earth doesn't it sell ad space on the one piece of real estate that football fans can't help but see: the players themselves?

This weekend, the NFL makes its annual pilgrimage to London for a one-off game at Wembley Stadium. This year, the Denver Broncos play the San Francisco 49ers. The game will be played just like it's played in the States, but it'll look a bit different.

For a typical NFL game, the only advertising visible at field level comes from sponsors who, according to the NFL, are related to the playing of the game itself: the Gatorade cooler, the Motorola headsets, Wilson footballs, Riddell helmets and a small Reebok logo on the uniforms. But in London, the league opens up the playbook and sells field advertising for products that have nothing to with the game of football. (Or at least playing the game - beer, for instance.)

World Cup Edition

World Cup Edition: Steve Levitt on why the center cannot hold in penalty kicks, why a running track hurts home-field advantage, and why the World Cup is an economist’s dream. We’ve got a new Freakonomics Radio podcast for you. (Download/subscribe at iTunes here, get the RSS feed here, read the transcript here, or listen live […]