The FREAKest Links

A study by University of Toronto assistant professor of organizational behavior Jennifer Berdahl found that, contrary to the conventional belief that a woman’s acting “feminine” in the workplace leads to sexual harassment, just the opposite may be true. Berdahl’s paper concluded that women who “act like men” are more likely to experience harassment, possibly because of the conduct’s use as a tool to reinforce traditional gender roles.

More on the topic of safety devices in cars: A study led by Dr. Craig Newgard, an assistant professor of emergency medicine and public health and preventive medicine at Oregon Health & Science University, found that short people (four-foot-eleven or less) and tall people (six-foot-three or taller) are at risk of serious injury from airbags. Researchers examined more than 11 years of data, including results from both older and newer redesigned models meant to compensate for a passenger’s weight (but not height).

Despite the production and distribution hiccups that it faced earlier this year, the Nintendo Wii created a “financial and strategic nirvana” for the company in its first six months of sales, according to Wall Street blogger Roger Ehrenberg.


egretman

I do not understand what the production and distribution of hiccups has to do with the Nintendo Wii. Am I missing something here?

RockoTDF

Perhaps we are seeing feminine women being sexually harassed less because their behavior creates an atmosphere where women are ladies and men are gentlemen?

kentavos

I don't think the author should have grouped together quid pro quo sexual harassment (go on a date with me or else) with environmental sexual harassment (sexual jokes, etc.).

I think if she has separated them out she would have found that women who are more feminine experience more quid pro quo harassment and women who are more masculine experience more environmental harassment.

I think she also would have found a much lower occurence of quid pro quo harassment compared to environmental harassment.

hsloboda

I recently experienced "environmental Harrassment" after purchasing a property in a very small town. It had not occurred to me prior to my purchase that my income level would be a cause for upset amongst the local male population, but ever since I've moved in, there has been an element of escalating harassment. This usually follows conversational attempts by various low paid or unemployed men in the community to figure out what I actually earn, information that I regard as none of their business. I am polite, but firm that my income is not open for discussion. I've noticed that they do not ask well paid men this question!

On taking a closer look at the situation, I realized that I earn more than probably any other woman in this town and most of the men, too. Those men that do earn more or have more assets are also the most comfortable and friendly with me. Most of the women in town either don't work or earn minimum wage. All of the women, regardless of income level, have been cautiously friendly.

Low paid men can be counted on now to call me by various derogatory epithets(female dog) when I attend public gatherings. As I have done nothing to them personally to explain their behavior, don't even know most of the worst offenders, and am generally regarded as a cheerful and friendly person, I'm convinced that I somehow threaten their notion of gender roles or somehow make them feel bad about their level of success or lack thereof. This was not my intention when I chose to move here. I only hope they can get over it as it does negatively impact my enjoyment of my new home ( I have been here a year now).

As a woman, I'm not clear on why men feel the need to tear down anything that threatens them? I think women are more likely to simply avoid it or ignore it.

Read more...

hsloboda

I recently moved into a very small town and have noted that the lower income men reacted very negatively to me, many without ever getting to know me, escalating now into harassment, name calling, and derogatory remarks when I'm in public. The women, by contrast, most of whom either don't work or earn minimum wage, have all been cautiously friendly. High income men, or men with obvious assets, have all been friendly and welcoming.

I am, compared to most of the town's residents, a highly paid, professional, single woman. Some of the worst harassment was preceded by attempts by my male neighbors to figure out what my income actually was. I've kept my personal business personal. I just hope they get over this soon as I've been here a year and their attitude is negatively impacting my enjoyment of my new home.

I'm also not clear why a woman purchasing a home in a community with every intent to contribute and be an active community member should be singled out for abuse by only low performing men? What is their point? If I go away will they suddenly feel better about themselves?

Read more...

ImFromGuam

Im confused...is 'sexual harrasment' an independent variable or dependent variable?

Did you notice that the airbag results resembles a model bell curve?

Rumor has it Nintendo Wii is working on a genital attachments to go with their 'scratch,sniff,and play' version due out sometime in 2009.

elle

Correct me if I am wrong, but the study done on gender driven prescriptive stereotyping is hardly news. Check out all the literature done by Swann and Gill. E.g.,

Gill, M.J. (2004). When information does not deter stereotyping: Prescriptive stereotyping can bias judgments under conditions that discourage descriptive stereotyping. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 40(5), 619-632.

Also, anyone recall a famous case: Anne Hopkins v Price Waterhouse?

kahomono

Please stop naming every third post the same thing.

Some of us orient ourselves in the post-stream by the titles....

711buddha

I still like the "freakest" features. Maybe add a date...

Anyway, not being s psychologist - but having gone to B school, the first article strikes me Myers-Briggs type E's getting more harrassment than I's.

This is hardly shocking. E's contact more people and as a result would encounter more people who harrass them. I would suspect I's would be less likely to report harrassment in any case.

rczeien

I think that women who act more masculine may be harassed because men harass each other. It may just be a way to treat them as "one of the guys".

egretman

I do not understand what the production and distribution of hiccups has to do with the Nintendo Wii. Am I missing something here?

RockoTDF

Perhaps we are seeing feminine women being sexually harassed less because their behavior creates an atmosphere where women are ladies and men are gentlemen?

kentavos

I don't think the author should have grouped together quid pro quo sexual harassment (go on a date with me or else) with environmental sexual harassment (sexual jokes, etc.).

I think if she has separated them out she would have found that women who are more feminine experience more quid pro quo harassment and women who are more masculine experience more environmental harassment.

I think she also would have found a much lower occurence of quid pro quo harassment compared to environmental harassment.

hsloboda

I recently experienced "environmental Harrassment" after purchasing a property in a very small town. It had not occurred to me prior to my purchase that my income level would be a cause for upset amongst the local male population, but ever since I've moved in, there has been an element of escalating harassment. This usually follows conversational attempts by various low paid or unemployed men in the community to figure out what I actually earn, information that I regard as none of their business. I am polite, but firm that my income is not open for discussion. I've noticed that they do not ask well paid men this question!

On taking a closer look at the situation, I realized that I earn more than probably any other woman in this town and most of the men, too. Those men that do earn more or have more assets are also the most comfortable and friendly with me. Most of the women in town either don't work or earn minimum wage. All of the women, regardless of income level, have been cautiously friendly.

Low paid men can be counted on now to call me by various derogatory epithets(female dog) when I attend public gatherings. As I have done nothing to them personally to explain their behavior, don't even know most of the worst offenders, and am generally regarded as a cheerful and friendly person, I'm convinced that I somehow threaten their notion of gender roles or somehow make them feel bad about their level of success or lack thereof. This was not my intention when I chose to move here. I only hope they can get over it as it does negatively impact my enjoyment of my new home ( I have been here a year now).

As a woman, I'm not clear on why men feel the need to tear down anything that threatens them? I think women are more likely to simply avoid it or ignore it.

Read more...

hsloboda

I recently moved into a very small town and have noted that the lower income men reacted very negatively to me, many without ever getting to know me, escalating now into harassment, name calling, and derogatory remarks when I'm in public. The women, by contrast, most of whom either don't work or earn minimum wage, have all been cautiously friendly. High income men, or men with obvious assets, have all been friendly and welcoming.

I am, compared to most of the town's residents, a highly paid, professional, single woman. Some of the worst harassment was preceded by attempts by my male neighbors to figure out what my income actually was. I've kept my personal business personal. I just hope they get over this soon as I've been here a year and their attitude is negatively impacting my enjoyment of my new home.

I'm also not clear why a woman purchasing a home in a community with every intent to contribute and be an active community member should be singled out for abuse by only low performing men? What is their point? If I go away will they suddenly feel better about themselves?

Read more...

ImFromGuam

Im confused...is 'sexual harrasment' an independent variable or dependent variable?

Did you notice that the airbag results resembles a model bell curve?

Rumor has it Nintendo Wii is working on a genital attachments to go with their 'scratch,sniff,and play' version due out sometime in 2009.

elle

Correct me if I am wrong, but the study done on gender driven prescriptive stereotyping is hardly news. Check out all the literature done by Swann and Gill. E.g.,

Gill, M.J. (2004). When information does not deter stereotyping: Prescriptive stereotyping can bias judgments under conditions that discourage descriptive stereotyping. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 40(5), 619-632.

Also, anyone recall a famous case: Anne Hopkins v Price Waterhouse?

kahomono

Please stop naming every third post the same thing.

Some of us orient ourselves in the post-stream by the titles....

711buddha

I still like the "freakest" features. Maybe add a date...

Anyway, not being s psychologist - but having gone to B school, the first article strikes me Myers-Briggs type E's getting more harrassment than I's.

This is hardly shocking. E's contact more people and as a result would encounter more people who harrass them. I would suspect I's would be less likely to report harrassment in any case.

rczeien

I think that women who act more masculine may be harassed because men harass each other. It may just be a way to treat them as "one of the guys".