The FREAKest Links: Second Life Sex and Hotel Towels Edition

More on the clash of sex and legal issues in Second Life: Tech.Blorge.com reports that one Second Life user is suing another (in real life) for copyright infringement over a virtual “sex bed” that lets avatars simulate 150 different carnal acts. Plaintiff Kevin Alderman, founder of Eros LLC, alleges that the defendant, “Second Life resident” Volkov Catteneo, copied and is selling the bed’s design.

An A.P. article reports a Starwood Hotels survey finding that over 60% of hotel guests are more likely to be environmentally wasteful during their stay than they are at home, using more water and electricity and producing more laundry.

Slate‘s Samantha Henig examines the science of “gut feelings,” which are caused by a complex system of neurons in the gastrointestinal tract that “looks a lot like the network of cells that exists in your actual brain.”


lermit

Hmmm seductive

.lermit

brucery

The Starwood Hotels survey hits on one of my pet peeves: hotels who try to save themselves money by appealing to their customers' environmentalism.

The only hotel I have encountered that has honestly dealt with this is the Comfort Inn in Tokyo/Ikebukuro. There, they encourage customers to not have their bed linens changed every day, and they credit the customer 500 yen/day (about US$5) for saving them the cost of doing that laundry. I gladly chose that option since the hotel was passing along their cost savings from my choice back to me.

In every other hotel I've stayed in that has encouraged me to forego linen changes, the hotel has done nothing to compensate me for the savings they get from my decision. Having experienced this in Tokyo done right, I almost never opt for this service. I do feel guilty, but it bothers me that the hotel is disingenuous in their appeals to my environmentalism (they're doing this to save money/make profits, not to save the planet). If they cared about saving the planet, they would pass the cost savings from those choices back to the guests who made those choices.

Read more...

egretman

My gut tells me that my brain knows more than my gut. So clearly my brain is just a slavish appendage of my gut. And my feelings are just my gut playing with my brain. So my gut feelings are merely the remnant memories of my brain's past accomplishments reflected and amplified by my gut.

Hey, I could give a TED talk.

discordian

“looks a lot like the network of cells that exists in your actual brain"

And the overall process map for my company looks a lot like the network of cells that exist in your actual brain too.

So I should let the company do my thinking for me...

Bigsnow

egretman +1 beatiful comment

http://www.videonos.com

wildfiction

Hotels promote green by asking guests not to waste but guests are smart and know that the hotel's bottom line is benefiting from them being green and probably feel hard done by this. If hotels were to promise to use those savings to buy carbon credits then maybe hotel guests would be more inclined to join them. Alternatively, give the guest bonus points on their rewards cards if they use less water, fewer towels, and less electric. Of course it would cost a fortune to install meters in each room.

makfan

I agree largely with comment #2. It seems the high-end chains (like Starwood properties) are especially happy to hang signs on the towel rack asking us to save the planet by reusing towels or not having our sheets changed daily.

It just bothers me that hotel rates have gone up, up, up the last several years and in return for that, we aren't given some sort of credit for saving the cost of servicing the room.

prosa

Tech.Blorge.com reports that one Second Life user is suing another (in real life) for copyright infringement over a virtual “sex bed” that lets avatars simulate 150 different carnal acts.

There almost certainly is a very strong inverse relationship between the number of sex acts one performs in a virtual fashion and the number of sex acts one performs in real life.

vizeroth

Some other points on hotel rooms: I would be more likely to reuse towels in hotels if the towels were larger. As a man over 6' tall with long hair I usually have to use 2 (and often 3) hotel towels where I would use only 1 at home, and where I have the option of using a dry towel at home if the hanging towel has yet to dry (due to humidity or whatever reason), I don't always have this option in a hotel if I don't have the towels replaced. I may reuse a hand towel (though often they replace these anyway if I leave them near the sink rather than hanging them), but the bath towels are far too small.

Beyond that, I'd have to say my electrical use in hotels is dependant on what they supply. For instance, I leave a light on to be able to find the bathroom if I wake up at night or early in the morning (especially when I'm on a long trip that involves stays in numerous hotels), and if they have twelve lights on one switch in the bathroom my electrical use will be higher than if they have a single light in the entranceway that won't interfere with my sleep. I use fewer of the lights in the room than I normally would in the living room at home, unless I have my family with me (and I use fewer lights in the living room at home if my family is out of town while I'm at home). Regardless of where I am, though, I leave the TV on to have changing light/sound in the room to keep outside lights/sounds from interrupting my sleep. If they chose to use more energy efficient lights and TVs in hotels it would probably help matters (both for their bottom line and the environment), but most (including Starwood chains) haven't done so, yet.

They could also do better to have more energy-efficient systems for heating water, and possibly include small measures such as solar panels on the rooves of these hotels to improve their energy consumption. Instead, they put the burden on the customers, and as others have already said, absorb the profits for whatever measures their customers have taken.

I might also add that on extended stays in hotels (where I might bring more items into my room because I've acquired more stuff on my trip), I tend to leave the do not disturb sign up or ask the front desk to suspend maid service altogether. In this case I save them not only the water use for washing the linens and towels, but also the time and energy (and chemical) use for cleaning the room. Still, there's no reward for this behavior other than a slight peace-of-mind that the illegal immigrants may not have been in my room watching mexican soap operas during the day.

Read more...

frankenduf

the hotels study shows why government regulation is needed in the energy resource market- private interest consumption tends towards wasting when "someone else" is paying for it- kudos to the conscientious above, but public policy needs to be steered towards conservation, otherwise it don't happen

lermit

Hmmm seductive

.lermit

brucery

The Starwood Hotels survey hits on one of my pet peeves: hotels who try to save themselves money by appealing to their customers' environmentalism.

The only hotel I have encountered that has honestly dealt with this is the Comfort Inn in Tokyo/Ikebukuro. There, they encourage customers to not have their bed linens changed every day, and they credit the customer 500 yen/day (about US$5) for saving them the cost of doing that laundry. I gladly chose that option since the hotel was passing along their cost savings from my choice back to me.

In every other hotel I've stayed in that has encouraged me to forego linen changes, the hotel has done nothing to compensate me for the savings they get from my decision. Having experienced this in Tokyo done right, I almost never opt for this service. I do feel guilty, but it bothers me that the hotel is disingenuous in their appeals to my environmentalism (they're doing this to save money/make profits, not to save the planet). If they cared about saving the planet, they would pass the cost savings from those choices back to the guests who made those choices.

Read more...

egretman

My gut tells me that my brain knows more than my gut. So clearly my brain is just a slavish appendage of my gut. And my feelings are just my gut playing with my brain. So my gut feelings are merely the remnant memories of my brain's past accomplishments reflected and amplified by my gut.

Hey, I could give a TED talk.

discordian

"looks a lot like the network of cells that exists in your actual brain"

And the overall process map for my company looks a lot like the network of cells that exist in your actual brain too.

So I should let the company do my thinking for me...

Bigsnow

egretman +1 beatiful comment

http://www.videonos.com

wildfiction

Hotels promote green by asking guests not to waste but guests are smart and know that the hotel's bottom line is benefiting from them being green and probably feel hard done by this. If hotels were to promise to use those savings to buy carbon credits then maybe hotel guests would be more inclined to join them. Alternatively, give the guest bonus points on their rewards cards if they use less water, fewer towels, and less electric. Of course it would cost a fortune to install meters in each room.

makfan

I agree largely with comment #2. It seems the high-end chains (like Starwood properties) are especially happy to hang signs on the towel rack asking us to save the planet by reusing towels or not having our sheets changed daily.

It just bothers me that hotel rates have gone up, up, up the last several years and in return for that, we aren't given some sort of credit for saving the cost of servicing the room.

prosa

Tech.Blorge.com reports that one Second Life user is suing another (in real life) for copyright infringement over a virtual "sex bed" that lets avatars simulate 150 different carnal acts.

There almost certainly is a very strong inverse relationship between the number of sex acts one performs in a virtual fashion and the number of sex acts one performs in real life.

vizeroth

Some other points on hotel rooms: I would be more likely to reuse towels in hotels if the towels were larger. As a man over 6' tall with long hair I usually have to use 2 (and often 3) hotel towels where I would use only 1 at home, and where I have the option of using a dry towel at home if the hanging towel has yet to dry (due to humidity or whatever reason), I don't always have this option in a hotel if I don't have the towels replaced. I may reuse a hand towel (though often they replace these anyway if I leave them near the sink rather than hanging them), but the bath towels are far too small.

Beyond that, I'd have to say my electrical use in hotels is dependant on what they supply. For instance, I leave a light on to be able to find the bathroom if I wake up at night or early in the morning (especially when I'm on a long trip that involves stays in numerous hotels), and if they have twelve lights on one switch in the bathroom my electrical use will be higher than if they have a single light in the entranceway that won't interfere with my sleep. I use fewer of the lights in the room than I normally would in the living room at home, unless I have my family with me (and I use fewer lights in the living room at home if my family is out of town while I'm at home). Regardless of where I am, though, I leave the TV on to have changing light/sound in the room to keep outside lights/sounds from interrupting my sleep. If they chose to use more energy efficient lights and TVs in hotels it would probably help matters (both for their bottom line and the environment), but most (including Starwood chains) haven't done so, yet.

They could also do better to have more energy-efficient systems for heating water, and possibly include small measures such as solar panels on the rooves of these hotels to improve their energy consumption. Instead, they put the burden on the customers, and as others have already said, absorb the profits for whatever measures their customers have taken.

I might also add that on extended stays in hotels (where I might bring more items into my room because I've acquired more stuff on my trip), I tend to leave the do not disturb sign up or ask the front desk to suspend maid service altogether. In this case I save them not only the water use for washing the linens and towels, but also the time and energy (and chemical) use for cleaning the room. Still, there's no reward for this behavior other than a slight peace-of-mind that the illegal immigrants may not have been in my room watching mexican soap operas during the day.

Read more...

frankenduf

the hotels study shows why government regulation is needed in the energy resource market- private interest consumption tends towards wasting when "someone else" is paying for it- kudos to the conscientious above, but public policy needs to be steered towards conservation, otherwise it don't happen