Who Is Listening to Freakonomics Radio?

We’ve now been making Freakonomics Radio for three years. (Here is a complete archive; you can also subscribe at iTunes or get an RSS feed.)

We have a good sense of the number of listeners (we do roughly 3 million downloads a month) but when it comes to who those listeners are, we don’t know very much. So we’ve put together a listener survey, below. If you have five spare minutes, please fill it in. What can we give you in return? If all goes well, more free podcasts!

Thanks.


Lisawaty Chandra

Love freakonomics!

Todd

I generally read the transcripts. I would have answered more positively if that was included in the survey. (In my opinion economics is better read and seen than heard.)

Eric Stott

Where is the incentive to fill out the form?

You are asking for people to fill out a form when those same people don't even read the blog, they just listen..

Nathan

Stupid tablet wouldn't let me answer the last one with "10." The answers were cut off.

Enter your name...

For anyone thinking, "Where's the link to the survey?", you have to have Javascript enabled, or at least scripts from research.net, to be able to see the survey at the bottom of the post.

George

While I like listening if on a walk or drive, i really prefer reading the transcripts, which i can do in a few minutes, as opposed to spending more time listening to podcasts w/ all the segues, music, etc. I'm more interested in the content than the experience, and can skim parts of less interest - it's all about efficiency!

Paul Mayes

I do enjoy the Freakocomics podcast immensely. It is my favorite podcast by far.

I never listen to NPR. NPR is too twee!

Matt

It may surprise you that your listeners aren't just in the US! Having one option for the rest of the world as 'international' sums up the American stereotype (rightly or wrongly) for many of us jolly foreigners.

Daniel Cayouettte

The music/jingle at the start of each of your podcasts always brings a smile - It is just awesome! Don't change that! Kudos to the person that put that together.

This is my favorite podcast and I hope you continue to produce them. Great job!

One of my favorite item was when Levitt talked about his wine experiment with his collegues. Another favorite item was the one where Levitt describes his favorite gift to his wife - the set of 10 inexpensive earrings. The banter between Dubner and Ky (the radio host) is also rather enjoyable.

I'm in Canada and I'm a big fan of the podcast and the books. I listen to the podcast either while taking a walk or on my commute to work.

Jen

On the other choice for podcasts listened too...it does not have a check box therefore it requires you to pick another podcast. I just lied. But, I wouldn't want that to skew your results

Pam

I love to ponder human behavior. I worked two decades as an Organization Consultant. I've taught behavior management concepts from the ops floor to the executive office and across operational functions in several organizations. Although mastery is elusive, it is a worthwhile pursuit. Thank you for keeping behavior in the front of minds. We so often want to point at other factors for life's successes and failures when 95% (my humble belief) is due to behaviors and their ensuing consequences.
And... Humans are loads of fun to observe (including ourselves) and ticklin' to try and figure out. :)

Kate

Tried to check the box for 10- most likely to recommend, but would not work on my ipad. I love Freakonomics!

JHF

I know some people have posted they like the Freakonomics music jingle (ohhh, ohhh, ohhh, ooohhh,...) but while I may be in the minority, I find it really annoying and turn the volume down whenever I hear the start of a Freakonomics commercial.

You guys should do some market research on the jingle. I think you'll be surprised.

James Fitzgerald

I turn down the volume on my radio when I hear the beginning of a Freakonomics promo. I find the "ohhh ohhh ohhh" sound so annoying. I wonder who else thinks the way I do. You might want to survey that. Sometimes I forget to turn the volume back on. That's bad for business for Freakonomics.

Thank you.