Season 9, Episode 43

Thanks to the pandemic, the telehealth revolution we’ve been promised for decades has finally arrived. Will it stick? Will it cut costs — and improve outcomes? We ring up two doctors and, of course, an economist to find out. To find out more, check out the podcast from which this hour was drawn: “The Doctor […]

The Doctor Will Zoom You Now (Ep. 423)

Thanks to the pandemic, the telehealth revolution we’ve been promised for decades has finally arrived. Will it stick? Will it cut costs — and improve outcomes? We ring up two doctors and, of course, an economist to find out.

Are You Ready for a Glorious Sunset? (Ep. 217 Rebroadcast)

The gist: we spend billions on end-of-life health care that doesn’t do much good. So what if a patient could forego the standard treatment and get a cash rebate instead?

How Many Doctors Does It Take to Start a Healthcare Revolution?

Season 5, Episode 3

In part one ("How Many Doctors Does It Take to Start a Healthcare Revolution?”), we continue conversations from last week's episode ("How Do We Know What Really Works in Healthcare?”). Anupam Jena, a physician, economist, and professor at Harvard Medical School, told us last week about his study that shows mortality rates improve when cardiologists are away at medical conferences. One possible explanation for his results, Jena says, is that many procedures, although highly effective, aren't better than doing nothing in certain cases.

How Many Doctors Does It Take to Start a Healthcare Revolution? (Ep. 202)

Our latest Freakonomics Radio episode is called “How Many Doctors Does It Take to Start a Healthcare Revolution?" (You can subscribe to the podcast at iTunes or elsewhere, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above. You can also read the transcript, which includes credits for the music you’ll hear in the episode.) The gist of the episode: The practice of medicine has been subsumed by the business of medicine. This is great news for healthcare shareholders -- and bad news for pretty much everyone else.