Freakonomics Quiz: Anointing the King

As we begin work on the illustrated version of SuperFreakonomics, I’ve been delving deeper into my father’s illustrious career in medical research. As some of you may know, he earned the moniker the “King of Farts” for his pathbreaking work on flatulence.

So in my continual (and seemingly fruitless) attempt to stump the readers of this blog, I offer what may be the most difficult Freakonomics quiz ever:

What magazine was the first to use the phrase “King of Farts” in reference to my father’s research?

The usual Freakonomics schwag to the first commenter to identify the magazine.


bonjour

New England Journal of Medicine

AlexC

Readers Digestion

DrS

I'm going with Scientific American

Levi

Chicago Tribune

Ian

playboy

Thom

Better Homes & Gardens

econobiker

I do not know what magazine coined your father's moniker but...

With a father dedicated to that kind of health research, how could his educated son NOT have developed a bent toward some sort of alternative ideas in research...

matt

i'd love to hear Weird Al pay tribute to your father's research by doing a Juice Newton/Queen of Hearts parody song.

David

Newsweek

tyler

New Yorker

kdg

Wow. I had not heard of this vein of research. You must have had a rough go in high school...

charles

Popular Science.....and that's an awesome handle btw.

Merus

I'm going to go a little more upmarket and say Newsweek.

Marco

The Onions

Marco

Mr. Methane also comes up in a Google search.

Kent

Readers Digestion? That should win for sheer cleverness!

Michael

Esquire

Erin

Esquire?

David

Time.

Michael D. Levitt, M.D.

I note that my son is once again attempting to fabricate his royal heritage. The truth is that Oui magazine reviewed an article I authored concerning a very gaseous patient, and anointed him (not me) the "King of Farts". The "King" was a co-author of the paper and used the pseudonym, "L.O. Sutalf" (flatus spelled backwards).