How a Football Coach Sends Signals That Have Nothing to Do With Football

On Yahoo! Sports, the football writer Jason Cole profiles Todd Haley, the Pittsburgh native who has returned to his hometown Steelers (yeah, they're my team too) to take over as offensive coordinator. Cole writes about Haley's notorious "screaming jags" and wonders if Haley and Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger can coexist:

Haley believes the outside world doesn't understand the method to his madness. In previous stops, Haley was walking into rebuilding situations that required more attitude.

"The general public doesn't know if that's contrived or not contrived and over the years you have seen a lot of coaches who have shown emotion," Haley said. "I take a great deal of pride in my passion for the game, but it was also what the situation dictated at the time."

Okay, nothing so noteworthy about that. But then Haley reveals himself as a master of signaling theory:

What Do the NFL and Girl With the Dragon Tattoo Have in Common?

Answer:

They are both reliant on the talents of the Rooney and Mara dynasties.

The Pittsburgh Steelers are majority-owned by the Rooney family. The late Art Rooney ("the Chief") ran the club for many years, ultimately giving way to son Dan, who has since given way to son Art Rooney II.

The New York Giants are 50 percent owned by John Mara. The late Tim Mara ran the club for many years, ultimately giving way to his son (and John's father) Wellington; there have been a variety of other Maras involved in the team.

Finally, an Investment Worth Making

From the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette:

In the decade since the stadium opened, the personal seat licenses or PSLs fans bought for the right to purchase season tickets have soared in value, offering a far better return on investment than the slumping stock market or even the price of a barrel of oil.

Take, for instance, a fan who bought a license for a seat in an upper level of Heinz Field for $250 in 2001. It now is selling for an average of $4,306, an increase of 1,622.4 percent, based on 2011 sales at STR Marketplace, a website authorized by the Steelers to allow fans to buy and sell seat licenses.

A seat license that went for $500 in an end zone now is selling for an average of $7,486, an increase of 1,397.2 percent. And one that sold in a lower midfield section for $2,700 when the stadium opened now is going for an average of $17,131, a jump of nearly 534.5 percent.

Taken together, the 49,278 seat licenses sold by the Steelers for an average of $1,172 since Heinz Field opened now are selling for $9,802, on average, or an increase of 736.3 percent, based on the sales data.