Archives for



Think Like a Child: A Freakonomics Radio Rebroadcast

This week’s Freakonomics Radio episode is a rebroadcast of the episode “Think Like a Child” (You can subscribe to the podcast at iTunes or elsewhere, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above. You can also read the transcript, which includes credits for the music you’ll hear in the episode.)

Our latest podcast is called “Think Like a Child.” (You can subscribe to the podcast at iTunes, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above. You can also read the transcript, which includes credits for the music you’ll hear in the episode.) Why would anyone want to think like a child? Aren’t kids just sloppy, inchoate versions of us, who can’t even say “I Don’t Know”?

Hardly. As Stephen Dubner and Steve Levitt describe in their new book, Think Like a Freak, thinking like a child can be very fruitful.

Read more…

Read More »



Nate Silver Says: “Everyone Is Kind of Weird” Full Transcript

[MUSIC: Russell L. Howard III, “Get Busy”] Stephen DUBNER: Hey, Nate? Nate SILVER: Hey. DUBNER: Hey, it’s Stephen Dubner, how’s it going? SILVER: Good. Good to talk to you. DUBNER: First off, just tell us in 60 seconds or less, what you actually do now in a given day. SILVER: So I am the editor-in-chief […] Read More »



Read an Early Excerpt from When to Rob a Bank

In celebration of the 10th anniversary of Freakonomics comes this curated collection from the most readable economics blog in the universe. When Freakonomics was first published, its authors, Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner, started a blog — and they’ve kept it up. The writing is more casual, more personal, even more outlandish than in their books. In When to Rob a Bank, they ask a host of typically off-center questions: Why don’t flight attendants get tipped? If you were a terrorist, how would you attack? And why does KFC always run out of fried chicken? Read More »



Diamonds Are a Marriage Counselor’s Best Friend Full Transcript

[MUSIC: Emerson Quartet, “String Sextet in D Minor” (from JOURNEYS)] Stephen J. DUBNER: In the theater, there is a principle known as “Chekhov’s Gun.” It comes from something once said by Anton Chekhov, the great Russian author and playwright:“You mustn’t put a loaded rifle on stage if no one intends to fire it. You shouldn’t […] Read More »



How Many Doctors Does It Take to Start a Healthcare Revolution? Full Transcript

This is a transcript of the Freakonomics Radio podcast “How Many Doctors Does It Take to Start a Healthcare Revolution?“ Stephen J. DUBNER: Okay, let’s be honest: how much of what you know about medicine, especially emergency medicine, comes from watching TV? ER CHARACTER 1: Gunshot wound’s on its way. ER CHARACTER 2: When? ER […] Read More »



How Do We Know What Really Works in Healthcare? Full Transcript

This is a transcript of the Freakonomics Radio podcast “How Do We Know What Really Works in Healthcare?” [MUSIC: Jessica Lurie, “Pudding” (from !Zipa Buka!)] Amy FINKELSTEIN: Yeah, so my parents are both biologists.  And I did not follow their route.  I didn’t go into the natural sciences. Stephen J. DUBNER: That’s Amy Finkelstein. FINKELSTEIN: […] Read More »



The Perfect Crime Rebroadcast Full Transcript

This is a transcript of the Freakonomics Radio podcast “The Perfect Crime (Rebroadcast)“. [MUSIC:  Johnny Sangster, “Slowbook”] Stephen J. DUBNER:  Hey podcast listeners. This week we’re replaying an episode from last year called “The Perfect Crime.” Here are a few things that have happened since we ran the episode. In 2014, 132 pedestrians were killed […] Read More »



The Perfect Crime: A Freakonomics Radio Rebroadcast


This week’s Freakonomics Radio episode is a rebroadcast of the episode “The Perfect Crime” (You can subscribe to the podcast at iTunes or elsewhere, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above. You can also read the transcript, which includes credits for the music you’ll hear in the episode.)

But let’s be clear: Dubner isn’t suggesting that anyone actually try this. In fact, the problem is that too many people are doing it already.

So what’s “the perfect crime”? It turns out that if you are driving your car and run over a pedestrian, there’s a good chance — especially if you live in New York — that you’ll barely be punished. Why?

We hear from Lisa Smith, a former prosecutor and now a law professor, who tells us that just 5 percent of the New York drivers who are involved in a fatal crash with a pedestrian are arrested. As it happens, New York has particularly narrow standards for conviction in such cases; there is a lot of variance among states.

read more…

Read More »