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Aziz Ansari Needs Another Toothbrush Full Transcript

This is a transcript of the Freakonomics Radio podcast “Aziz Ansari Needs Another Toothbrush” [MUSIC: Anton Dakanto, “Bistro” (from Plate of Jell)] Aziz ANSARI: I read the Internet so much I feel like I’m like on page a million of the worst book ever. Stephen J. DUBNER: Aziz Ansari is a comedian, an actor, and now […] Read More »



The Economics of Sleep, Part 2 Full Transcript

This is a transcript of the Freakonomics Radio podcast “The Economics of Sleep, Part 2” [MUSIC: Ruby Velle & The Soulphonics, “Coming Home To You” (from It’s About Time)] Stephen J. DUBNER: So are you saying right here and right now that you vow from today going forward, that for one week, that you’re going to […] Read More »



The Economics of Sleep, Part 2: A New Freakonomics Radio Episode


Our latest Freakonomics Radio episode is “The Economics of Sleep, Part 2.” (You can subscribe to the podcast at iTunes or elsewhere, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above. You can also read the transcript, which includes credits for the music you’ll hear in the episode.)

In our previous episode, we primarily discussed the health implications of sleep. This time, we look at the economic impact. One big takeaway: if you sleep more, you will likely earn more money. How do we know this? Thanks to a fascinating paper by Matthew Gibson and Jeffrey Shrader, called “Time Use and Productivity: The Wage Returns to Sleep.” As Gibson tells us, economists have traditionally not paid too much attention to sleep — in part because good data were hard to come by: Read More »



The Economics of Sleep, Part 1 Full Transcript

[MUSIC: Donvision, “Flip Flop”] Stephen J. DUBNER: We begin in Brownsville, Brooklyn, at the Brownsville Multi-Service Family Health Center. Graciela PHLATTS: Good afternoon. DUBNER: Graciela Phlatts – she goes by Grace – is a nurse and the clinic’s director of nursing. She was born in Panama, moved to New York about 20 years ago. PHLATTS: […] Read More »



A Better Way to Eat REBRAODCAST Full Transcript

[MUSIC: Tony Flynn, “Star Spangled Banner”] Stephen J. DUBNER: Hey podcast listeners … hope you’re having, or have already had, a great Fourth of July. When you think of Independence Day, what comes to mind? The Declaration of Independence, perhaps, and all those tetchy colonists. Fireworks maybe. But if you’re like me, the first thing […] Read More »



A Better Way to Eat: A Freakonomics Radio Rebroadcast


This week’s Freakonomics Radio episode is a rebroadcast of the episode “A Better Way to Eat” (You can subscribe to the podcast at iTunes or elsewhere, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above. You can also read the transcript, which includes credits for the music you’ll hear in the episode.)

It features an interview with Takeru Kobayashi, who revolutionized the sport of competitive eating. So you’ll learn plenty about the tactics — physical, mental, and strategic — that Kobi employed while earning six straight victories in the Nathan’s Famous Fourth of July International Hot Dog Eating Contest. (He has also set world records with many other foods.) But the episode isn’t really about competitive eating. It’s about seeing what the rest of us can learn from the breakthroughs that Kobi accomplished in his training and his thinking. If there’s ever someone who truly thinks like a Freak, it’s Takeru Kobayashi.

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Is It Okay for Restaurants to Racially Profile Their Employees? Full Transcript

DUBNER: Hey Levitt, pretend for a minute you’ve decided to open up a restaurant. Can you imagine that? LEVITT: Sure, easy, easy to imagine something like that. DUBNER: Would you enjoy it? LEVITT: No, I would hate it more than anything. DUBNER: Oh, but you can imagine it? LEVITT: I can imagine it, yeah. DUBNER: […] Read More »



Make Me a Match Full Transcript

[MUSIC: Greg Ruby, “Someone Told Me Your Secret” (from The Rhythm Runners)] Al ROTH: Okay, I’m Al Roth and I’m a professor of economics at Stanford. Stephen J. DUBNER: For many years, Roth had taught economics at Harvard. But he and his wife, who’s a human-factors engineer, had relocated. ROTH: We had just moved into […] Read More »